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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Application Logs
10th Edition
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Student comments on practical use of a theory, from the Instructors Manual and additions to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 30—Agenda-Setting Theory

Glenda
I think the media’s agenda setting works all too well on children (at least it did on me). Except it wasn’t news I was watching; it was the Saturday morning line-up. After all, as a child I had a very high need for orientation. For some inexplicable reason, anything that the TV displayed from 6 a.m. to noon on Saturday had high relevance to me (including the color bars from 6-7). And as a child, anything dealing with growing up, being an adult or understanding the world around me touched a point of high uncertainty within my semi-hardened skull. As a result, Saturday morning TV had the power to tell me what to think about. I spent my play time acting out the characters from my favorite shows. I pleaded with my parents to provide me with whatever the commercials were peddling—sugar cereal, dolls with brushable hair, sports cars. I wasn’t picky. I dreamt Smurfs. I breathed Wonder Woman. I made wedding plans revolving around George of the Jungle. I thought about what the powers behind the television, based on their agenda, wanted me to think about. To be perfectly honest, I’m still a huge fan of Wonder Woman and dolls with comb-able hair.

Kristy
I remember back in my freshman year of college when I was at Indiana University and a story about immigration was in the news. It was on the cover of every Time and Newsweek magazine and newspaper I saw. I was taking Political Science then and we spent full classes discussing it. At one point, an exasperated student raised her hand and asked if we could talk about something else. The teacher gave her a strange look and finally said, "I know you are sick of talking about it, but it's news and we must discuss it."

After reading this chapter I realized the power of the media in telling us what to think about and discuss. People were tired of thinking about it, but since it was in the news, the teacher insisted it must be important. She didn't tell us we had to agree or disagree with any of it, but we at least had to think about it and discuss it. I wondered why at the time because it didn't seem to be affecting my life in anyway. But I thought about it a lot at the time because it was in the news and I think about what's in the news regardless of whether or not it is directly affecting me. I was curious about the situation and I also had to learn more for my class. I had a high "need for orientation."



You can access Application Logs for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS

 APP LOGS

 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Application Logs
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Student comments on practical use of a theory, from the Instructors Manual and additions to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 30—Agenda-Setting Theory

Glenda
I think the media’s agenda setting works all too well on children (at least it did on me). Except it wasn’t news I was watching; it was the Saturday morning line-up. After all, as a child I had a very high need for orientation. For some inexplicable reason, anything that the TV displayed from 6 a.m. to noon on Saturday had high relevance to me (including the color bars from 6-7). And as a child, anything dealing with growing up, being an adult or understanding the world around me touched a point of high uncertainty within my semi-hardened skull. As a result, Saturday morning TV had the power to tell me what to think about. I spent my play time acting out the characters from my favorite shows. I pleaded with my parents to provide me with whatever the commercials were peddling—sugar cereal, dolls with brushable hair, sports cars. I wasn’t picky. I dreamt Smurfs. I breathed Wonder Woman. I made wedding plans revolving around George of the Jungle. I thought about what the powers behind the television, based on their agenda, wanted me to think about. To be perfectly honest, I’m still a huge fan of Wonder Woman and dolls with comb-able hair.

Kristy
I remember back in my freshman year of college when I was at Indiana University and a story about immigration was in the news. It was on the cover of every Time and Newsweek magazine and newspaper I saw. I was taking Political Science then and we spent full classes discussing it. At one point, an exasperated student raised her hand and asked if we could talk about something else. The teacher gave her a strange look and finally said, "I know you are sick of talking about it, but it's news and we must discuss it."

After reading this chapter I realized the power of the media in telling us what to think about and discuss. People were tired of thinking about it, but since it was in the news, the teacher insisted it must be important. She didn't tell us we had to agree or disagree with any of it, but we at least had to think about it and discuss it. I wondered why at the time because it didn't seem to be affecting my life in anyway. But I thought about it a lot at the time because it was in the news and I think about what's in the news regardless of whether or not it is directly affecting me. I was curious about the situation and I also had to learn more for my class. I had a high "need for orientation."



You can access Application Logs for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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