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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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short video overview (3:01).

Application Logs
10th Edition
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Student comments on practical use of a theory, from the Instructors Manual and additions to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 31—Genderlect Styles

Karen
My best girlfriend and I will talk and talk for hours with many interruptions of each other, yet we have both agreed that the interruptions never bother us. Just as Tannen explains in her idea of cooperative overlap, we see the interruptions as positive and supportive cues signaling the fact that we are listening to each other. I would even go so far as to say that I need interruption in order to know that my friend is listening and involved in my story. Talking to one of my guy best friends is a totally different story. The other day, he was telling me a serious story about his life at home. I was very into what he was saying and interjected a short comment about how I feel for his situation and what he is going through. Yet immediately I could tell that he did not like me speaking when he was telling the story. Even though my comment was supportive, it did not matter to him, because he wanted control of the conversation and viewed my comment as an attack on his power.

Nate
The best example of a real difference between the need for connection and status is how my wife and I get into conflicts. I usually initiate arguments by bringing up things we need to work on, whereas my wife needs to know that everything is good right now. You see, I want to have the best relationship of anyone we know. My wife does want the same, but she thinks it should be that way to start off with, a difficult thing for a male communication student.

Erin
Last year I dated a guy long distance who was also very into acting and theater. I was having a lot of difficulty at the time with my confidence as an actress due to my failures, especially compared to his large successes. So I shared my feelings with him, hoping he would relate and have some wisdom for me. By the end of the conversation, he had become really angry because he couldn't solve my problem, especially from 75 miles away. This of course made me feel even worse. I tried to explain that I wasn't asking for him to solve anything. I just wanted to talk with him because I felt he as the only one who would understand. A little more than a month later we broke up. One of the main reasons was that he thought he was being a bad boyfriend because he couldn't ever help me with my problems.

Jeremy
I have a good friend named Autumn who I stay in touch with regularly through conversations on the phone. Tannen's concept of genderlects helps to explain this stark contrast in the subjects we bring up for discussion. I usually bring up matters of WHAT I am currently doing--my activities, accomplishments, and tasks before me--and seek to know the same of Autumn. Autumn usually brings up HOW people we both know are doing or she shares self-depreciating stories about her own life. My talk is very much report talk, while Autumn's is rapport, and neither of us have much interest in the other's type of talk, but go along with it until we can change the subject back to our own focus. I see several implications for the future in this theory. Understanding now that girls use rapport talk and share about others out of a desire for community, I can properly respond to what that type of communication from girls is trying to do instead of discounting it or trying to change the subject back to role/status oriented topics. Also, I don't believe that the masculine and feminine lines are drawn as distinctly between men and women as Tannen portrays, since I find myself being very feminine in my listening, conflict, and private speaking style. I am very masculine in my asking questions, telling stories, and public speaking style. However, knowing that there is more than one way to approach these activities shows me that I can either choose between different styles for better results or I can understand the needs and intentions of others (especially becoming the "giant ear" that girls apparently love).



You can access Application Logs for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS

 APP LOGS

 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Application Logs
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Student comments on practical use of a theory, from the Instructors Manual and additions to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 31—Genderlect Styles

Karen
My best girlfriend and I will talk and talk for hours with many interruptions of each other, yet we have both agreed that the interruptions never bother us. Just as Tannen explains in her idea of cooperative overlap, we see the interruptions as positive and supportive cues signaling the fact that we are listening to each other. I would even go so far as to say that I need interruption in order to know that my friend is listening and involved in my story. Talking to one of my guy best friends is a totally different story. The other day, he was telling me a serious story about his life at home. I was very into what he was saying and interjected a short comment about how I feel for his situation and what he is going through. Yet immediately I could tell that he did not like me speaking when he was telling the story. Even though my comment was supportive, it did not matter to him, because he wanted control of the conversation and viewed my comment as an attack on his power.

Nate
The best example of a real difference between the need for connection and status is how my wife and I get into conflicts. I usually initiate arguments by bringing up things we need to work on, whereas my wife needs to know that everything is good right now. You see, I want to have the best relationship of anyone we know. My wife does want the same, but she thinks it should be that way to start off with, a difficult thing for a male communication student.

Erin
Last year I dated a guy long distance who was also very into acting and theater. I was having a lot of difficulty at the time with my confidence as an actress due to my failures, especially compared to his large successes. So I shared my feelings with him, hoping he would relate and have some wisdom for me. By the end of the conversation, he had become really angry because he couldn't solve my problem, especially from 75 miles away. This of course made me feel even worse. I tried to explain that I wasn't asking for him to solve anything. I just wanted to talk with him because I felt he as the only one who would understand. A little more than a month later we broke up. One of the main reasons was that he thought he was being a bad boyfriend because he couldn't ever help me with my problems.

Jeremy
I have a good friend named Autumn who I stay in touch with regularly through conversations on the phone. Tannen's concept of genderlects helps to explain this stark contrast in the subjects we bring up for discussion. I usually bring up matters of WHAT I am currently doing--my activities, accomplishments, and tasks before me--and seek to know the same of Autumn. Autumn usually brings up HOW people we both know are doing or she shares self-depreciating stories about her own life. My talk is very much report talk, while Autumn's is rapport, and neither of us have much interest in the other's type of talk, but go along with it until we can change the subject back to our own focus. I see several implications for the future in this theory. Understanding now that girls use rapport talk and share about others out of a desire for community, I can properly respond to what that type of communication from girls is trying to do instead of discounting it or trying to change the subject back to role/status oriented topics. Also, I don't believe that the masculine and feminine lines are drawn as distinctly between men and women as Tannen portrays, since I find myself being very feminine in my listening, conflict, and private speaking style. I am very masculine in my asking questions, telling stories, and public speaking style. However, knowing that there is more than one way to approach these activities shows me that I can either choose between different styles for better results or I can understand the needs and intentions of others (especially becoming the "giant ear" that girls apparently love).



You can access Application Logs for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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