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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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 APPLICATION LOGS



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New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Application Logs
10th Edition
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Student comments on practical use of a theory, from the Instructors Manual and additions to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 36—Co-Cultural Theory

Jane
 As I read this theory, I kept saying to myself "That would never be me. I’d never keep silent, even when I think I’m the minority." I’ve always seen myself as opinionated, outspoken, and direct. Clearly I would favor accommodation but I won’t cave in and just assimilate or pull away and separate. In my heart of hearts, I think that I wouldn’t bow down to the pressure, I’d stand my ground. I looked at the strategies of accommodation and I think they all seem reasonably easy to do—I would be open, seek like-minded people, and genuinely try to build bridges between myself and the others.

This was all well and good in theory. But in practice, it was harder than I expected. Last summer, I was on a two-week intensive study-abroad program in South America. I didn’t go with any of my buddies—it was just me and a bunch of people I didn’t know. Quickly I figured out that I wasn’t in the majority. I am an evangelical Christian—and most of the people in the program were staunchly non-religious or vaguely spiritual but not into organized religion. I am a political conservative—and everyone else was very liberal. I am studious—and really wanted to expand my academic and cultural horizons on this trip when everyone else seems to value drinking and partying over study sessions and coffee.

If I had done what I thought I would, based on Orbe’s theory, I would have tried to create links between us and I would have held onto my values while still connecting with them. Instead, I spent most of the two weeks by myself. As soon as the group sessions finished, I would go out of my way to take walks by the river in solitude and avoided sitting with others at meals. I just wanted to give myself a buffer, a wall between me and them. Even though they were the more powerful group (and there was more of them), I realize I opted for separation instead of assimilation. The way I took a stand was by getting away from them altogether.



You can access Application Logs for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS

 APP LOGS

 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Application Logs
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Student comments on practical use of a theory, from the Instructors Manual and additions to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 36—Co-Cultural Theory

Jane
 As I read this theory, I kept saying to myself "That would never be me. I’d never keep silent, even when I think I’m the minority." I’ve always seen myself as opinionated, outspoken, and direct. Clearly I would favor accommodation but I won’t cave in and just assimilate or pull away and separate. In my heart of hearts, I think that I wouldn’t bow down to the pressure, I’d stand my ground. I looked at the strategies of accommodation and I think they all seem reasonably easy to do—I would be open, seek like-minded people, and genuinely try to build bridges between myself and the others.

This was all well and good in theory. But in practice, it was harder than I expected. Last summer, I was on a two-week intensive study-abroad program in South America. I didn’t go with any of my buddies—it was just me and a bunch of people I didn’t know. Quickly I figured out that I wasn’t in the majority. I am an evangelical Christian—and most of the people in the program were staunchly non-religious or vaguely spiritual but not into organized religion. I am a political conservative—and everyone else was very liberal. I am studious—and really wanted to expand my academic and cultural horizons on this trip when everyone else seems to value drinking and partying over study sessions and coffee.

If I had done what I thought I would, based on Orbe’s theory, I would have tried to create links between us and I would have held onto my values while still connecting with them. Instead, I spent most of the two weeks by myself. As soon as the group sessions finished, I would go out of my way to take walks by the river in solitude and avoided sitting with others at meals. I just wanted to give myself a buffer, a wall between me and them. Even though they were the more powerful group (and there was more of them), I realize I opted for separation instead of assimilation. The way I took a stand was by getting away from them altogether.



You can access Application Logs for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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