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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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Application Logs
10th Edition
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Student comments on practical use of a theory, from the Instructors Manual and additions to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 25—Media Ecology

Nate
Despite some of his ideas, I think McLuhan has uncovered something more important than he gets credit for. I know for myself, that in my lifetime alone the paradigm shift from simplistic electronics to the new huge systems and networks of computers everywhere has definitely made the world feel like a “global village.” My own attitudes have become much more humanitarian and less focused on the inevitable differences between me and other people of all types. I think McLuhan is right in saying that how we shape our tools determines how they shape us. In San Francisco I worked at a network computer company. The technology of the “hour” vastly affected how information was transferred at stores and restaurants everywhere. It also became very apparent that cellular phones, beepers, pagers, etc. were widely advocated to “make it” in the new workplace. In a lot of ways they have become inseparable.

Ashley
I found McLuhan's discussion of The Electronic Age: Rise of Global Village to be intriguing as I watch the habits of a teenager I baby-sit numerous weekends of the year. Meredith is a product of the "all-at-once" world that McLuhan describes as resonating with everything else as in a total electrical field. She is only allowed to talk on the phone until ten o'clock, but as she describes to me, she then quickly runs downstairs to her computer in the basement and gets online. The amazing thing is, all her friends will either enter the same chat room or interchange messages as if she never got off the phone. She will continue to communicate in this way until whenever she pleases. This has made her family system different from the rules I had just a few years ago in high school. When it was time to hang up, then that was it! Meredith is instantaneously connected with numerous friends, and finds this just important as talking on the phone with them, and has thus gone "back to the future." Whether this behavior is best described as part of the new era that McLuhan did not foresee, it definitely "converges" multimedia systems and creates the world that Meredith desires, exactly when she wants to communicate.

Chris
It almost goes without saying that electronic media have significantly decreased the attention span of the American public. This has become exceedingly obvious to me while I study films in my Digital Editing class. While I thought that Hitchcock's directing is brilliant, the pacing of his films seems so slow compared to the rhythm of current pictures. I am forced to really concentrate to keep my mind from wandering. I'm not sure what creates an attention span, but whatever it is, the speed of access to information that is available is putting the patience of the attention span into unneeded oblivion. Like an unused muscle that eventually atrophies, the attention span is no longer needed, and as such, it is ceasing to exist. In the movie Moulin Rouge, the "Roxanne" musical portion, lasting roughly six minutes, contained over 300 cuts! The media is destroying our ability to focus on a given item for any amount of time.

Lani
After pondering this theory and reflecting on the effects of the global village on my own life, I beg to differ that I become closer to people through electronic media, such as the Internet and email. Take for instance an experience I went through my freshman year concerning the popular communication medium of instant messaging (IM). I was obsessed with IM. Having the ability to talk with a number of friends back home instantaneously was a great way to keep my phone bill down. Also, using IM to talk to new freshman that I met at Wheaton was perfect for "getting to know" someone through a more informal and less awkward manner than "real" conversations. Unfortunately, IM consumed my life. I was content with a short, fragmented, superficial "conversation" with my friends back home, which in turn caused us to lose touch rather than keep in touch. I found that the only friends I kept from high school were the ones I called on the phone or wrote snail mail letters to. In the same way, I didn't develop close, deep friendships with people at Wheaton over IM; it took spending time face-to-face to really cultivate true relationships at school.



You can access Application Logs for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS

 APP LOGS

 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Application Logs
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Student comments on practical use of a theory, from the Instructors Manual and additions to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 25—Media Ecology

Nate
Despite some of his ideas, I think McLuhan has uncovered something more important than he gets credit for. I know for myself, that in my lifetime alone the paradigm shift from simplistic electronics to the new huge systems and networks of computers everywhere has definitely made the world feel like a “global village.” My own attitudes have become much more humanitarian and less focused on the inevitable differences between me and other people of all types. I think McLuhan is right in saying that how we shape our tools determines how they shape us. In San Francisco I worked at a network computer company. The technology of the “hour” vastly affected how information was transferred at stores and restaurants everywhere. It also became very apparent that cellular phones, beepers, pagers, etc. were widely advocated to “make it” in the new workplace. In a lot of ways they have become inseparable.

Ashley
I found McLuhan's discussion of The Electronic Age: Rise of Global Village to be intriguing as I watch the habits of a teenager I baby-sit numerous weekends of the year. Meredith is a product of the "all-at-once" world that McLuhan describes as resonating with everything else as in a total electrical field. She is only allowed to talk on the phone until ten o'clock, but as she describes to me, she then quickly runs downstairs to her computer in the basement and gets online. The amazing thing is, all her friends will either enter the same chat room or interchange messages as if she never got off the phone. She will continue to communicate in this way until whenever she pleases. This has made her family system different from the rules I had just a few years ago in high school. When it was time to hang up, then that was it! Meredith is instantaneously connected with numerous friends, and finds this just important as talking on the phone with them, and has thus gone "back to the future." Whether this behavior is best described as part of the new era that McLuhan did not foresee, it definitely "converges" multimedia systems and creates the world that Meredith desires, exactly when she wants to communicate.

Chris
It almost goes without saying that electronic media have significantly decreased the attention span of the American public. This has become exceedingly obvious to me while I study films in my Digital Editing class. While I thought that Hitchcock's directing is brilliant, the pacing of his films seems so slow compared to the rhythm of current pictures. I am forced to really concentrate to keep my mind from wandering. I'm not sure what creates an attention span, but whatever it is, the speed of access to information that is available is putting the patience of the attention span into unneeded oblivion. Like an unused muscle that eventually atrophies, the attention span is no longer needed, and as such, it is ceasing to exist. In the movie Moulin Rouge, the "Roxanne" musical portion, lasting roughly six minutes, contained over 300 cuts! The media is destroying our ability to focus on a given item for any amount of time.

Lani
After pondering this theory and reflecting on the effects of the global village on my own life, I beg to differ that I become closer to people through electronic media, such as the Internet and email. Take for instance an experience I went through my freshman year concerning the popular communication medium of instant messaging (IM). I was obsessed with IM. Having the ability to talk with a number of friends back home instantaneously was a great way to keep my phone bill down. Also, using IM to talk to new freshman that I met at Wheaton was perfect for "getting to know" someone through a more informal and less awkward manner than "real" conversations. Unfortunately, IM consumed my life. I was content with a short, fragmented, superficial "conversation" with my friends back home, which in turn caused us to lose touch rather than keep in touch. I found that the only friends I kept from high school were the ones I called on the phone or wrote snail mail letters to. In the same way, I didn't develop close, deep friendships with people at Wheaton over IM; it took spending time face-to-face to really cultivate true relationships at school.



You can access Application Logs for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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