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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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Application Logs
10th Edition
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Student comments on practical use of a theory, from the Instructors Manual and additions to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 23—Dramatism

Jill
Burke would say that the persuasion speech on eating disorders (which I gave as an example for Aristotle’s Art of Rhetoric) was an attempt for me to purge my guilt, and that I gave that speech because I felt guilty about my past actions in being involved in an eating disorder and for having a sister who was also involved in one. Since I concentrated on the media and its obsession with beauty and thinness, Burke would say I was concentrating on the scene or situation and was therefore one who believed I was a victim of outside forces. He would say I blamed society for the flaws in my behavior. He would probably label the word “obsession” as my devil term and the word “refocus” or the word “inner beauty” as my god-term. He would say that I felt guilty for not having done better, and that I needed to give this speech in order to relieve myself or at least to express my negative emotions. He would say I chose the second choice of victimization rather than self-blame.

Jessie
I received a phone call yesterday from a Southwest bookseller—not to buy a book, but to work for them. Suddenly, I was pulled into a drama of cat and mouse. He (the cat) kept dropping cheese (identification) to me (the mouse). For instance, students gave him my name, he used to be a student, I'm interested in ministry—oh Billy Graham did something like this, he knows about finding a summer job, etc. Anything I said, he could identify with. I should feel guilty for not making use of my persuasion/communication skills. This job would purge me of that guilt. His purpose was clear—to recruit. He identified well with me, but I'm cynical when I know his purpose is to persuade me to do what he wants.

Erik
I'm a big fan of Bruce Springsteen (and what red-blooded American male isn't) and a lot of his songs are like that. They draw you in until you care for the guy in the song and stop just being a listener. A lot of this, in my opinion, has to do with the identification that Springsteen has with his audience. Burke said that the effective communicator can show consubstantiality by giving signs that his properties are the same as the listeners. Bruce looks, acts, talks, and dresses like a normal guy from New Jersey. I can relate to him because he could be my brother, cousin, or uncle. Burke says, "Without identification, there is no persuasion." Well, I identify with Springsteen and I believe in what he is saying and doing.

Erin
This theory brings me back to the cafeteria in sixth grade. I was sitting around my lunch table with Rachel and Jillian and Karisa. Amy wasn't there yet. All the girls started making fun of Amy. "She's such a nerd! Look at how she studies all the time!"

"Yeah, and I hate the way she clears her throat in class."

"And then she waves her hand when she wants to answer a question!"

"She practically yells, ‘Pick me! Pick me!' Then she'll jump out of her chair and start waving again!"

The insults kept rolling about poor Amy. I don't think any of us girls disliked Amy terribly, but we could unite against her. We made Amy the victim of our guilt and fear and self-doubt. In doing so, we created a tight-knit group that could identify with at least one thing: none of us liked Amy.

Jeremiah
A few of the guys on my floor needed to, or just wanted to, identity with me somehow. I would get approached hearing a phrase such as, "Yo, wazup, dog?" or "How you be livin!" I was offended and taken back. I did not expect it. What a way to try to identify with me. How about, "Hello, what's your name?" We all have names. They thought that was my language. They wanted to convince me that they know me and all of those that are like me.



You can access Application Logs for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS

 APP LOGS

 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Application Logs
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Student comments on practical use of a theory, from the Instructors Manual and additions to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 23—Dramatism

Jill
Burke would say that the persuasion speech on eating disorders (which I gave as an example for Aristotle’s Art of Rhetoric) was an attempt for me to purge my guilt, and that I gave that speech because I felt guilty about my past actions in being involved in an eating disorder and for having a sister who was also involved in one. Since I concentrated on the media and its obsession with beauty and thinness, Burke would say I was concentrating on the scene or situation and was therefore one who believed I was a victim of outside forces. He would say I blamed society for the flaws in my behavior. He would probably label the word “obsession” as my devil term and the word “refocus” or the word “inner beauty” as my god-term. He would say that I felt guilty for not having done better, and that I needed to give this speech in order to relieve myself or at least to express my negative emotions. He would say I chose the second choice of victimization rather than self-blame.

Jessie
I received a phone call yesterday from a Southwest bookseller—not to buy a book, but to work for them. Suddenly, I was pulled into a drama of cat and mouse. He (the cat) kept dropping cheese (identification) to me (the mouse). For instance, students gave him my name, he used to be a student, I'm interested in ministry—oh Billy Graham did something like this, he knows about finding a summer job, etc. Anything I said, he could identify with. I should feel guilty for not making use of my persuasion/communication skills. This job would purge me of that guilt. His purpose was clear—to recruit. He identified well with me, but I'm cynical when I know his purpose is to persuade me to do what he wants.

Erik
I'm a big fan of Bruce Springsteen (and what red-blooded American male isn't) and a lot of his songs are like that. They draw you in until you care for the guy in the song and stop just being a listener. A lot of this, in my opinion, has to do with the identification that Springsteen has with his audience. Burke said that the effective communicator can show consubstantiality by giving signs that his properties are the same as the listeners. Bruce looks, acts, talks, and dresses like a normal guy from New Jersey. I can relate to him because he could be my brother, cousin, or uncle. Burke says, "Without identification, there is no persuasion." Well, I identify with Springsteen and I believe in what he is saying and doing.

Erin
This theory brings me back to the cafeteria in sixth grade. I was sitting around my lunch table with Rachel and Jillian and Karisa. Amy wasn't there yet. All the girls started making fun of Amy. "She's such a nerd! Look at how she studies all the time!"

"Yeah, and I hate the way she clears her throat in class."

"And then she waves her hand when she wants to answer a question!"

"She practically yells, ‘Pick me! Pick me!' Then she'll jump out of her chair and start waving again!"

The insults kept rolling about poor Amy. I don't think any of us girls disliked Amy terribly, but we could unite against her. We made Amy the victim of our guilt and fear and self-doubt. In doing so, we created a tight-knit group that could identify with at least one thing: none of us liked Amy.

Jeremiah
A few of the guys on my floor needed to, or just wanted to, identity with me somehow. I would get approached hearing a phrase such as, "Yo, wazup, dog?" or "How you be livin!" I was offended and taken back. I did not expect it. What a way to try to identify with me. How about, "Hello, what's your name?" We all have names. They thought that was my language. They wanted to convince me that they know me and all of those that are like me.



You can access Application Logs for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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