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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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 APPLICATION LOGS



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New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Application Logs
10th Edition
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Student comments on practical use of a theory, from the Instructors Manual and additions to the website


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Chapter 22—The Rhetoric

Jill
In my Fundamentals of Oral Communication class we were taught these exact methods in giving speeches. To fully relate this to Aristotle’s tactics, I will tell of my persuasion speech. I gave a speech on eating disorders and how the media encourage eating disorders in women. In my invention or construction of my argument, I showed how statistics of eating disorders have risen from the past to now. I also showed examples of advertisements with skinny models which the women of our day expect themselves to look like. With these examples, I failed to show a contrast of advertisements of the past or possible advertisements of the future. I did show that through using perfect bodies in advertisements, we have glorified this part of our nature over other more important things. In my arrangement, I gave an interesting story to catch the audience’s attention, then I shared that I had credibility because I had struggled with an eating disorder as well as had my sister and best friend. I stated my purpose was to make my audience aware of the effect of the media and to stop the glorification of perfect bodies. I did not wait to the end of my speech to reveal my main point. Rather I ended with examples of what we could do. My style contained vivid examples with the actual advertisements and stories of those who had suffered. I spoke in everyday language, but failed to create fresh metaphors. I spoke candidly, which made it easier not to memorize my speech, which may have been at odds with Aristotle’s encouragement of memory. It’s amazing that Aristotle’s speech techniques are still being taught in classrooms today.



You can access Application Logs for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS

 APP LOGS

 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Application Logs
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Student comments on practical use of a theory, from the Instructors Manual and additions to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 22—The Rhetoric

Jill
In my Fundamentals of Oral Communication class we were taught these exact methods in giving speeches. To fully relate this to Aristotle’s tactics, I will tell of my persuasion speech. I gave a speech on eating disorders and how the media encourage eating disorders in women. In my invention or construction of my argument, I showed how statistics of eating disorders have risen from the past to now. I also showed examples of advertisements with skinny models which the women of our day expect themselves to look like. With these examples, I failed to show a contrast of advertisements of the past or possible advertisements of the future. I did show that through using perfect bodies in advertisements, we have glorified this part of our nature over other more important things. In my arrangement, I gave an interesting story to catch the audience’s attention, then I shared that I had credibility because I had struggled with an eating disorder as well as had my sister and best friend. I stated my purpose was to make my audience aware of the effect of the media and to stop the glorification of perfect bodies. I did not wait to the end of my speech to reveal my main point. Rather I ended with examples of what we could do. My style contained vivid examples with the actual advertisements and stories of those who had suffered. I spoke in everyday language, but failed to create fresh metaphors. I spoke candidly, which made it easier not to memorize my speech, which may have been at odds with Aristotle’s encouragement of memory. It’s amazing that Aristotle’s speech techniques are still being taught in classrooms today.



You can access Application Logs for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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