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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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 FURTHER RESOURCES



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resources. Read more


New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


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Chapter 36—Co-Cultural Theory

Theoretical considerations

Gina Castle Bell, Mark C. Hopson, Melinda R. Weathers, and Katy A. Ross, “From ‘Laying the Foundations’ to Building the House: Extending Orbe's (1998) Co-Cultural Theory to Include ‘Rationalization’ as a Formal Strategy,” Communication Studies, Vol. 66, 2014, pp. 1-26.

Sara DeTurk, “Allies in Action: The Communicative Experiences of People Who Challenge Social Injustice on Behalf of Others,” Communication Quarterly, Vol. 59, 2011, pp. 569-590.

Jesse Fox and Katie M. Warber, “Queer Identity Management and Political Self-Expression on Social Networking Sites: A Co-Cultural Approach to the Spiral of Silence,” Journal of Communication, Vol. 65, 2015, pp. 79-100.

Mark P. Orbe and Colin J. Batten, “Diverse Dominant Group Responses to Contemporary Co-Cultural Concerns: U.S. Intergroup Dynamics in the Trump Era,” Journal of Contemporary Rhetoric, Vol. 7, 2017, pp. 19-33.

Rona Tamiko Halualani, S. Lily Mendoza, and Jolanta A. Drzewiecka, “‘Critical’ Junctures in Intercultural Communication Studies: A Review,” Review of Communication, Vol. 9, 2009, pp. 17-35.

 

Applied contexts

Michael K. Ault and Bobbi Van Gilder, “Polygamy in the United States: How Marginalized Religious Communities Cope with Stigmatizing Discourses Surrounding Plural Marriage,” Journal of Intercultural Communication Research, Vol. 44, 2015, pp. 307-328.

Bijie Bie and Lu Tang, “Chinese Gay Men’s Coming Out Narratives: Connecting Social Relationship to Co-Cultural Theory,” Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, Vol. 9, 2016, pp. 351-367.

Mark Congdon Jr., “What's Wrong with Me?: An Autoethnographic Investigation of the Co-Cultural Communicative Practices of Living with Tourette Syndrome during Adolescence,” Qualitative Report, Vol. 19, 2014, pp. 1-25.

Eun-Jeong Han and Paula Groves Price, “Communicating Across Difference: Co-Cultural Theory, Capital and Multicultural Families in Korea,” Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, Vol. 11, 2017, pp. 21-41.

Phyllis Ngai, “The Impact of Teachers' Communication Approach on Children's Co-Cultural Adaptation,” Journal of Intercultural Communication, Vol. 37, 2015.

C. Kyle Rudick, Michael Sollitto, Christopher J. Claus, Amy Aldridge Sanford, Keith Nainby, and Kathryn B. Golsan, “Comparing Hispanic-To-White Co-Cultural Communication at Four-Year, Public Hispanic Serving and Predominately White Institutions,” Communication Reports, Vol. 30, 2017, pp. 104-115.

Karla D. Scott, “Communication Strategies Across Cultural Borders: Dispelling Stereotypes, Performing Competence, and Redefining Black Womanhood,” Women's Studies in Communication, Vol. 36, 2013, pp. 312-329.

Melinda R. Weathers and Mark C. Hopson, “‘I Define What Hurts Me’: A Co-Cultural Theoretical Analysis of Communication Factors Related to Digital Dating Abuse,” Howard Journal of Communications, Vol. 26, 2015, pp. 95-113.

 

Other teaching ideas

Elizabeth Root, “Staging Scenes of Co-Cultural Communication: Acting Out Aspects of Marginalized and Dominant Identities,” Communication Teacher, Vol. 32, 2018, pp. 13-18.

 



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS


 RESOURCES



Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 36—Co-Cultural Theory

Theoretical considerations

Gina Castle Bell, Mark C. Hopson, Melinda R. Weathers, and Katy A. Ross, “From ‘Laying the Foundations’ to Building the House: Extending Orbe's (1998) Co-Cultural Theory to Include ‘Rationalization’ as a Formal Strategy,” Communication Studies, Vol. 66, 2014, pp. 1-26.

Sara DeTurk, “Allies in Action: The Communicative Experiences of People Who Challenge Social Injustice on Behalf of Others,” Communication Quarterly, Vol. 59, 2011, pp. 569-590.

Jesse Fox and Katie M. Warber, “Queer Identity Management and Political Self-Expression on Social Networking Sites: A Co-Cultural Approach to the Spiral of Silence,” Journal of Communication, Vol. 65, 2015, pp. 79-100.

Mark P. Orbe and Colin J. Batten, “Diverse Dominant Group Responses to Contemporary Co-Cultural Concerns: U.S. Intergroup Dynamics in the Trump Era,” Journal of Contemporary Rhetoric, Vol. 7, 2017, pp. 19-33.

Rona Tamiko Halualani, S. Lily Mendoza, and Jolanta A. Drzewiecka, “‘Critical’ Junctures in Intercultural Communication Studies: A Review,” Review of Communication, Vol. 9, 2009, pp. 17-35.

 

Applied contexts

Michael K. Ault and Bobbi Van Gilder, “Polygamy in the United States: How Marginalized Religious Communities Cope with Stigmatizing Discourses Surrounding Plural Marriage,” Journal of Intercultural Communication Research, Vol. 44, 2015, pp. 307-328.

Bijie Bie and Lu Tang, “Chinese Gay Men’s Coming Out Narratives: Connecting Social Relationship to Co-Cultural Theory,” Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, Vol. 9, 2016, pp. 351-367.

Mark Congdon Jr., “What's Wrong with Me?: An Autoethnographic Investigation of the Co-Cultural Communicative Practices of Living with Tourette Syndrome during Adolescence,” Qualitative Report, Vol. 19, 2014, pp. 1-25.

Eun-Jeong Han and Paula Groves Price, “Communicating Across Difference: Co-Cultural Theory, Capital and Multicultural Families in Korea,” Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, Vol. 11, 2017, pp. 21-41.

Phyllis Ngai, “The Impact of Teachers' Communication Approach on Children's Co-Cultural Adaptation,” Journal of Intercultural Communication, Vol. 37, 2015.

C. Kyle Rudick, Michael Sollitto, Christopher J. Claus, Amy Aldridge Sanford, Keith Nainby, and Kathryn B. Golsan, “Comparing Hispanic-To-White Co-Cultural Communication at Four-Year, Public Hispanic Serving and Predominately White Institutions,” Communication Reports, Vol. 30, 2017, pp. 104-115.

Karla D. Scott, “Communication Strategies Across Cultural Borders: Dispelling Stereotypes, Performing Competence, and Redefining Black Womanhood,” Women's Studies in Communication, Vol. 36, 2013, pp. 312-329.

Melinda R. Weathers and Mark C. Hopson, “‘I Define What Hurts Me’: A Co-Cultural Theoretical Analysis of Communication Factors Related to Digital Dating Abuse,” Howard Journal of Communications, Vol. 26, 2015, pp. 95-113.

 

Other teaching ideas

Elizabeth Root, “Staging Scenes of Co-Cultural Communication: Acting Out Aspects of Marginalized and Dominant Identities,” Communication Teacher, Vol. 32, 2018, pp. 13-18.

 



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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