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DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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Further Resources
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Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


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Chapter 31—Genderlect Styles

A good general collection of essays on related issues is Linda A. M. Perry, Lynn H. Turner, and Helen M. Sterk (eds.), Constructing and Reconstructing Gender: The Links Among Communication, Language, and Gender, State University of New York Press, Albany, 1992.  Particularly relevant is Nancy Hoar’s piece, “Genderlect, Powerlect, and Politeness” (pp. 127-36). 

William Rawlins’ books have much of interest to say about the ways males and females communicate with their friends and romantic partners.

  • William K. Rawlins, Friendship Matters: Communication, Dialectics, and the Life Course, Routledge, New York, 1992.
  • William K. Rawlins, The Compass of Friendship: Narratives, Identities, and Dialogues, Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, 2009. 

For a critical assessment of the male genderlect, see Peter F. Murphy, Studs, Tools, and the Family Jewels: Metaphors Men Live By, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, 2001.

 

Other texts by Tannen

Deborah Tannen (ed.), Framing and Discourse, Oxford University Press, New York, 1993.

Deborah Tannen (ed.), Gender and Conversational Interaction, Oxford University Press, New York, 1993.

Her books on families include:

  • Deborah Tannen, You Were Always Mom’s Favorite!: Sisters in Conversation Throughout Their Lives, Random House, New York, 2009.
  • Deborah Tannen, You’re Wearing THAT?: Understanding Mothers and Daughters in Conversation, Random House, New York, 2006.
  • Deborah Tannen, I Only Say This Because I Love You: How The Way We Talk Can Make or Break Family Relationships Throughout Our Lives, Random House, New York, 2001.

She addresses women’s friendships in You’re the Only One I Can Tell: Inside the Language of Women’s Friendships, Ballantine Books, New York, 2017.

Women and men’s workplace relationships are the subject of her book Talking From 9 to 5: Women and Men at Work, Avon Books, 1995.

You may wish to check out her work The Argument Culture: Stopping America’s War of Words, Ballantine Books, New York, 1999.  Although probably misnamed—Tannen is not really against argument when it is conducted rationally, fairly, and productively—it takes on the discourse of contentiousness that may be too prevalent in our society. 

 

Critiques of Tannen

An attack on Tannen’s genderlect theory in You Just Don’t Understand appears in Daena J. Goldsmith and Patricia A. Fulfs, “‘You Just Don’t Have the Evidence’: An Analysis of Claims and Evidence in Deborah Tannen’s You Just Don’t Understand,Annals of the International Communication Association, Vol. 22, 1999, pp. 1-49. 

 

Theoretical considerations

Kathryn Heath, Jill Flynn, and Mary Davis Holt, “Women, Find Your Voice,” Harvard Business Review, Vol. 92, 2014, pp. 118-121.

Anthony Mulac, James J. Bradac, and Pamela Gibbons, ”Empirical Support for the Gender-as-Culture Hypothesis: An Intercultural Analysis of Male/Female Language Differences,” Human Communication Research, Vol. 27, 2001, pp. 121-152.

Anthony Mulac, Howard Giles, James J. Bradac, and Nicholas A. Palomares, ”The Gender-Linked Language Effect: An Empirical Test of a General Process Model,” Language Sciences, Vol. 38, 2013, pp. 22-31.

Deborah Tannen, “The Medium Is the Metamessage: Conversational Style in New Media Interaction,” In Discourse 2.0: Language and New Media, Deborah Tannen and Anna Marie Trester (eds.), Georgetown University Press, Washington, DC, 2013, pp. 99-118.

Christopher J. Zahn, “The Bases for Differing Evaluations of Male and Female Speech: Evidence from Ratings of Transcribed Conversation,” Communication Monographs, Vol. 56, 1989, pp. 59-74.

 

Language differences

Patricia Easteal, Lorana Bartels, and Sally Bradford, “Language, Gender and ‘Reality’: Violence Against Women,” International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice, Vol. 40, 2012, pp. 324-337.

Albert N. Katz and Jonathan A. R. Woodbury, “Gender Differences in Being Thanked for Performing a Favor,” Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, Vol. 46, 2017, pp. 481-496.

Malka Muchnik and Anat Stavans, “Telling the Same Story to Your Child: Mothers' versus Fathers' Storytelling Interactions,” Women & Language, Vol. 32, 2009, pp. 60-69.

Dhiraj Murthy, Sawyer Bowman, Alexander J. Gross, and Marisa McGarry, “Do We Tweet Differently From Our Mobile Devices? A Study of Language Differences on Mobile and Web-Based Twitter Platforms,” Journal of Communication, Vol. 65, 2015, pp. 816-837.

Felicia Roberts and Alda Norris, “Gendered Expectations for ‘Agreeableness’ in Response to Requests and Opinions,” Communication Research Reports, Vol. 33, 2016, pp. 16-23.

 

Applied contexts

Nina Haferkamp, Sabrina C. Eimler, Anna-Margarita Papadakis, and Jana Vanessa Kruck, “Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus? Examining Gender Differences in Self-Presentation on Social Networking Sites,” Cyberpsychology, Behavior & Social Networking, Vol. 15, 2012, pp. 91-98.

Rose Helens-Hart, “Females’ (Non)Disclosure of Minority Sexual Identities in the Workplace From a Communication Privacy Management Perspective,” Communication Studies, Vol. 68, 2017, pp. 607-623.

Kent Kaiser, “Sports Reporters in the Twittersphere: Challenging and Breaking Down Traditional Conceptualizations of Genderlect,” Online Information Review, Vol. 40, 2016, pp. 761-784.

Roxana D. Maiorescu, “Crisis Management at General Motors and Toyota: An Analysis of Gender-Specific Communication and Media Coverage,” Public Relations Review, Vol. 42, 2016, pp. 556-563.

Carey Noland, “‘Macho Men Don't Communicate’: The Role of Communication in HIV Prevention,” Journal of Men's Studies, Vol. 16, 2008, pp. 18-31.

Philip Sullivan, “Communication Differences Between Male and Female Team Sport Athletes,” Communication Reports, Vol. 17, 2004, pp. 121-128.



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS


 RESOURCES



Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 31—Genderlect Styles

A good general collection of essays on related issues is Linda A. M. Perry, Lynn H. Turner, and Helen M. Sterk (eds.), Constructing and Reconstructing Gender: The Links Among Communication, Language, and Gender, State University of New York Press, Albany, 1992.  Particularly relevant is Nancy Hoar’s piece, “Genderlect, Powerlect, and Politeness” (pp. 127-36). 

William Rawlins’ books have much of interest to say about the ways males and females communicate with their friends and romantic partners.

  • William K. Rawlins, Friendship Matters: Communication, Dialectics, and the Life Course, Routledge, New York, 1992.
  • William K. Rawlins, The Compass of Friendship: Narratives, Identities, and Dialogues, Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, 2009. 

For a critical assessment of the male genderlect, see Peter F. Murphy, Studs, Tools, and the Family Jewels: Metaphors Men Live By, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, 2001.

 

Other texts by Tannen

Deborah Tannen (ed.), Framing and Discourse, Oxford University Press, New York, 1993.

Deborah Tannen (ed.), Gender and Conversational Interaction, Oxford University Press, New York, 1993.

Her books on families include:

  • Deborah Tannen, You Were Always Mom’s Favorite!: Sisters in Conversation Throughout Their Lives, Random House, New York, 2009.
  • Deborah Tannen, You’re Wearing THAT?: Understanding Mothers and Daughters in Conversation, Random House, New York, 2006.
  • Deborah Tannen, I Only Say This Because I Love You: How The Way We Talk Can Make or Break Family Relationships Throughout Our Lives, Random House, New York, 2001.

She addresses women’s friendships in You’re the Only One I Can Tell: Inside the Language of Women’s Friendships, Ballantine Books, New York, 2017.

Women and men’s workplace relationships are the subject of her book Talking From 9 to 5: Women and Men at Work, Avon Books, 1995.

You may wish to check out her work The Argument Culture: Stopping America’s War of Words, Ballantine Books, New York, 1999.  Although probably misnamed—Tannen is not really against argument when it is conducted rationally, fairly, and productively—it takes on the discourse of contentiousness that may be too prevalent in our society. 

 

Critiques of Tannen

An attack on Tannen’s genderlect theory in You Just Don’t Understand appears in Daena J. Goldsmith and Patricia A. Fulfs, “‘You Just Don’t Have the Evidence’: An Analysis of Claims and Evidence in Deborah Tannen’s You Just Don’t Understand,Annals of the International Communication Association, Vol. 22, 1999, pp. 1-49. 

 

Theoretical considerations

Kathryn Heath, Jill Flynn, and Mary Davis Holt, “Women, Find Your Voice,” Harvard Business Review, Vol. 92, 2014, pp. 118-121.

Anthony Mulac, James J. Bradac, and Pamela Gibbons, ”Empirical Support for the Gender-as-Culture Hypothesis: An Intercultural Analysis of Male/Female Language Differences,” Human Communication Research, Vol. 27, 2001, pp. 121-152.

Anthony Mulac, Howard Giles, James J. Bradac, and Nicholas A. Palomares, ”The Gender-Linked Language Effect: An Empirical Test of a General Process Model,” Language Sciences, Vol. 38, 2013, pp. 22-31.

Deborah Tannen, “The Medium Is the Metamessage: Conversational Style in New Media Interaction,” In Discourse 2.0: Language and New Media, Deborah Tannen and Anna Marie Trester (eds.), Georgetown University Press, Washington, DC, 2013, pp. 99-118.

Christopher J. Zahn, “The Bases for Differing Evaluations of Male and Female Speech: Evidence from Ratings of Transcribed Conversation,” Communication Monographs, Vol. 56, 1989, pp. 59-74.

 

Language differences

Patricia Easteal, Lorana Bartels, and Sally Bradford, “Language, Gender and ‘Reality’: Violence Against Women,” International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice, Vol. 40, 2012, pp. 324-337.

Albert N. Katz and Jonathan A. R. Woodbury, “Gender Differences in Being Thanked for Performing a Favor,” Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, Vol. 46, 2017, pp. 481-496.

Malka Muchnik and Anat Stavans, “Telling the Same Story to Your Child: Mothers' versus Fathers' Storytelling Interactions,” Women & Language, Vol. 32, 2009, pp. 60-69.

Dhiraj Murthy, Sawyer Bowman, Alexander J. Gross, and Marisa McGarry, “Do We Tweet Differently From Our Mobile Devices? A Study of Language Differences on Mobile and Web-Based Twitter Platforms,” Journal of Communication, Vol. 65, 2015, pp. 816-837.

Felicia Roberts and Alda Norris, “Gendered Expectations for ‘Agreeableness’ in Response to Requests and Opinions,” Communication Research Reports, Vol. 33, 2016, pp. 16-23.

 

Applied contexts

Nina Haferkamp, Sabrina C. Eimler, Anna-Margarita Papadakis, and Jana Vanessa Kruck, “Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus? Examining Gender Differences in Self-Presentation on Social Networking Sites,” Cyberpsychology, Behavior & Social Networking, Vol. 15, 2012, pp. 91-98.

Rose Helens-Hart, “Females’ (Non)Disclosure of Minority Sexual Identities in the Workplace From a Communication Privacy Management Perspective,” Communication Studies, Vol. 68, 2017, pp. 607-623.

Kent Kaiser, “Sports Reporters in the Twittersphere: Challenging and Breaking Down Traditional Conceptualizations of Genderlect,” Online Information Review, Vol. 40, 2016, pp. 761-784.

Roxana D. Maiorescu, “Crisis Management at General Motors and Toyota: An Analysis of Gender-Specific Communication and Media Coverage,” Public Relations Review, Vol. 42, 2016, pp. 556-563.

Carey Noland, “‘Macho Men Don't Communicate’: The Role of Communication in HIV Prevention,” Journal of Men's Studies, Vol. 16, 2008, pp. 18-31.

Philip Sullivan, “Communication Differences Between Male and Female Team Sport Athletes,” Communication Reports, Vol. 17, 2004, pp. 121-128.



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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