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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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 FURTHER RESOURCES



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resources. Read more


New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
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View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 33—Muted Group Theory

One of the great fictional example of women as a muted group is Margaret Atwood’s dystopian novel The Handmaid’s Tale, Fawcett Crest, New York, 1986, which is also available as a 1990 film and, in 2017, was released as a streaming TV series on Hulu. 

For discussion of gender-specific language, see Julia T. Wood, Gendered Lives: Communication, Gender and Culture,11th ed., Wadsworth, Boston, 2014.

 

Theoretical considerations

Cheris Kramarae, “Muted Group Theory and Communication: Asking Dangerous Questions,” Women & Language, Vol. 28, 2005, pp. 55-61.

Julia T. Wood, “Feminist Standpoint Theory and Muted Group Theory: Commonalities and Divergences,” Women & Language, Vol. 28, 2005, pp. 61-64.

 

Sexual harassment & violence

Ann Burnett,Jody L. Mattern, Liliana L. Herakova, David H. Kahl Jr., Cloy Tobola, and Susan E. Bornsen, “Communicating/Muting Date Rape: A Co-Cultural Theoretical Analysis of Communication Factors Related to Rape Culture on a College Campus,” Journal of Applied Communication Research, Vol. 37, 2009, pp. 465-485.

Patricia Easteal, Kate Holland, Keziah Judd, “Enduring Themes and Silences in Media Portrayals of Violence Against Women,” Women's Studies International Forum, Vol. 48, 2015, pp. 103-113.

 

Online & digital contexts

Jesse Fox and Wai Yen Tang, “Women’s Experiences with General and Sexual Harassment in Online Video Games: Rumination, Organizational Responsiveness, Withdrawal, and Coping Strategies,” New Media & Society, Vol. 19, 2017, pp. 1290-1307.

Melonie Fullick, “‘Gendering’ the Self in Online Dating Discourse,” Canadian Journal of Communication, Vol. 38, 2013, pp. 545-562.

Judith Hoover, Sally Hastings, and George Musambira, “‘Opening a Gap’ in Culture: Women's Uses of the Compassionate Friends Website,” Women & Language, Vol. 32, 2009, pp. 82-90.

Kent Kaiser, “Sports Reporters in the Twittersphere: Challenging and Breaking Down Traditional Conceptualizations of Genderlect,” Online Information Review, Vol. 40, 2016, pp. 761-784.

Jenny Ungbha Korn, J. U. (2016). “‘Genderless’ Online Discourse in the 1970s: Muted Group Theory in Early Social Computing,” in Ada's Legacy: Cultures of Computing from the Victorian to the Digital Age, Robin Hammerman and Andrew L. Russell (eds.), 2016, Morgan & Claypool Publishers, Williston, VT, pp. 213-229.

 

Politics

Jennifer J. Jones, “Talk ‘Like a Man’: The Linguistic Styles of Hillary Clinton, 1992–2013,” Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 14, 2016, pp. 625-642.

Tetyana Lokot, “#IAmNotAfraidToSayIt: Stories of Sexual Violence as Everyday Political Speech on Facebook,” Information, Communication & Society, Vol. 21, 2018, pp. 802-817.

 

Language, humor and sexist jokes

Robyn K. Mallett, Thomas E. Ford, and Julie A. Woodzicka, “What Did He Mean By That? Humor Decreases Attributions of Sexism and Confrontation of Sexist Jokes,” Sex Roles, Vol. 75, 2016, 272-284.

Keri Matwick and Kelsi Matwick, “Self-Deprecatory Humor on TV Cooking Shows,” Language & Communication, Vol. 56, 2017, pp. 33-41.

Nalyn Sriwattanakomen, “Who's Laughing Now? The Effects of Sexist and Rape Humor,” Psi Chi Journal of Psychological Research, Vol. 22, 2017, pp. 85-97.

 

Other applied contexts

Katherine Grace Hendrix and Cicely Wilson, “Virtual Invisibility: Race and Communication Education,” Communication Education, Vol. 63, 2014, pp. 405-428.

Jamie L. Huber, “Singing It Out: Riot Grrrls, Lilith Fair, and Feminism,” Kaleidoscope: A Graduate Journal of Qualitative Communication Research, Vol. 9, 2010, pp. 965-985.

Christopher John Hunt and Karen Gonsalkorale, “Who Cares What She Thinks, What Does He Say? Links Between Masculinity, In-Group Bonding and Gender Harassment,” Sex Roles, Vol. 70, 2014, pp. 14-27.

Kissack, H. (2010). “Muted Voices: A Critical Look at E-Male in Organizations,” Journal of European Industrial Training, Vol. 34, 2010, pp. 539-551.

Louise North, “Damaging and Daunting: Female Journalists’ Experiences of Sexual Harassment in the Newsroom,” Feminist Media Studies, Vol. 16, 2016, pp. 495-510.

Jacob Roecker, Nathan Fuchs, Joanne Cook, Marie Crookston, and Dana Henderson, “Both Sides Now: A Bona Fide Group Perspective of Families and Divorce Mediation,” American Communication Journal, Vol. 10, 2008, available online at http://ac-journal.org/journal/2008/Summer/3BothSidesNow.pdf

Jimmy Sanderson, Melinda Weathers, Katherine Snedaker, and Kelly Gramlich, “‘I Was Able to Still Do My Job on the Field and Keep Playing’: An Investigation of Female and Male Athletes’ Experiences With (Not) Reporting Concussions,” Communication and Sport, Vol. 5, 2017, pp. 267-287.



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS


 RESOURCES



Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 33—Muted Group Theory

One of the great fictional example of women as a muted group is Margaret Atwood’s dystopian novel The Handmaid’s Tale, Fawcett Crest, New York, 1986, which is also available as a 1990 film and, in 2017, was released as a streaming TV series on Hulu. 

For discussion of gender-specific language, see Julia T. Wood, Gendered Lives: Communication, Gender and Culture,11th ed., Wadsworth, Boston, 2014.

 

Theoretical considerations

Cheris Kramarae, “Muted Group Theory and Communication: Asking Dangerous Questions,” Women & Language, Vol. 28, 2005, pp. 55-61.

Julia T. Wood, “Feminist Standpoint Theory and Muted Group Theory: Commonalities and Divergences,” Women & Language, Vol. 28, 2005, pp. 61-64.

 

Sexual harassment & violence

Ann Burnett,Jody L. Mattern, Liliana L. Herakova, David H. Kahl Jr., Cloy Tobola, and Susan E. Bornsen, “Communicating/Muting Date Rape: A Co-Cultural Theoretical Analysis of Communication Factors Related to Rape Culture on a College Campus,” Journal of Applied Communication Research, Vol. 37, 2009, pp. 465-485.

Patricia Easteal, Kate Holland, Keziah Judd, “Enduring Themes and Silences in Media Portrayals of Violence Against Women,” Women's Studies International Forum, Vol. 48, 2015, pp. 103-113.

 

Online & digital contexts

Jesse Fox and Wai Yen Tang, “Women’s Experiences with General and Sexual Harassment in Online Video Games: Rumination, Organizational Responsiveness, Withdrawal, and Coping Strategies,” New Media & Society, Vol. 19, 2017, pp. 1290-1307.

Melonie Fullick, “‘Gendering’ the Self in Online Dating Discourse,” Canadian Journal of Communication, Vol. 38, 2013, pp. 545-562.

Judith Hoover, Sally Hastings, and George Musambira, “‘Opening a Gap’ in Culture: Women's Uses of the Compassionate Friends Website,” Women & Language, Vol. 32, 2009, pp. 82-90.

Kent Kaiser, “Sports Reporters in the Twittersphere: Challenging and Breaking Down Traditional Conceptualizations of Genderlect,” Online Information Review, Vol. 40, 2016, pp. 761-784.

Jenny Ungbha Korn, J. U. (2016). “‘Genderless’ Online Discourse in the 1970s: Muted Group Theory in Early Social Computing,” in Ada's Legacy: Cultures of Computing from the Victorian to the Digital Age, Robin Hammerman and Andrew L. Russell (eds.), 2016, Morgan & Claypool Publishers, Williston, VT, pp. 213-229.

 

Politics

Jennifer J. Jones, “Talk ‘Like a Man’: The Linguistic Styles of Hillary Clinton, 1992–2013,” Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 14, 2016, pp. 625-642.

Tetyana Lokot, “#IAmNotAfraidToSayIt: Stories of Sexual Violence as Everyday Political Speech on Facebook,” Information, Communication & Society, Vol. 21, 2018, pp. 802-817.

 

Language, humor and sexist jokes

Robyn K. Mallett, Thomas E. Ford, and Julie A. Woodzicka, “What Did He Mean By That? Humor Decreases Attributions of Sexism and Confrontation of Sexist Jokes,” Sex Roles, Vol. 75, 2016, 272-284.

Keri Matwick and Kelsi Matwick, “Self-Deprecatory Humor on TV Cooking Shows,” Language & Communication, Vol. 56, 2017, pp. 33-41.

Nalyn Sriwattanakomen, “Who's Laughing Now? The Effects of Sexist and Rape Humor,” Psi Chi Journal of Psychological Research, Vol. 22, 2017, pp. 85-97.

 

Other applied contexts

Katherine Grace Hendrix and Cicely Wilson, “Virtual Invisibility: Race and Communication Education,” Communication Education, Vol. 63, 2014, pp. 405-428.

Jamie L. Huber, “Singing It Out: Riot Grrrls, Lilith Fair, and Feminism,” Kaleidoscope: A Graduate Journal of Qualitative Communication Research, Vol. 9, 2010, pp. 965-985.

Christopher John Hunt and Karen Gonsalkorale, “Who Cares What She Thinks, What Does He Say? Links Between Masculinity, In-Group Bonding and Gender Harassment,” Sex Roles, Vol. 70, 2014, pp. 14-27.

Kissack, H. (2010). “Muted Voices: A Critical Look at E-Male in Organizations,” Journal of European Industrial Training, Vol. 34, 2010, pp. 539-551.

Louise North, “Damaging and Daunting: Female Journalists’ Experiences of Sexual Harassment in the Newsroom,” Feminist Media Studies, Vol. 16, 2016, pp. 495-510.

Jacob Roecker, Nathan Fuchs, Joanne Cook, Marie Crookston, and Dana Henderson, “Both Sides Now: A Bona Fide Group Perspective of Families and Divorce Mediation,” American Communication Journal, Vol. 10, 2008, available online at http://ac-journal.org/journal/2008/Summer/3BothSidesNow.pdf

Jimmy Sanderson, Melinda Weathers, Katherine Snedaker, and Kelly Gramlich, “‘I Was Able to Still Do My Job on the Field and Keep Playing’: An Investigation of Female and Male Athletes’ Experiences With (Not) Reporting Concussions,” Communication and Sport, Vol. 5, 2017, pp. 267-287.



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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