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DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


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Chapter 19—Cultural Approach to Organizations

If you enjoy Pacanowsky’s work, we recommend “Postscript: A Small-Town Cop: Communication In, Out, and About a Crisis,” Communication and Organizations: An Interpretive Approach, ed. Linda Putnam and Michael Pacanowsky (Beverly Hills: Sage, 1983), 261-82. 

Paul Schrodt provides an empirical examination of the relationship between group and individual identity in “The Relationship Between Organizational Identification and Organizational Culture: Employee Perceptions of Culture and Identification in a Retail Sales Organization,” Communication Studies 53 (Summer 2002): 189-202.

As Linda Smircich's comments suggest, the tension between pragmatically based research and ethnography free of management constraints and agendas is a significant issue in the field of organizational communication.  Nick Trujillo's “Corporate Philosophy and Professional Baseball: (Re)defining the Texas Rangers,” Case Studies in Organizational Communication, ed. Beverly Davenport Sypher (New York: Guilford, 1990), 87-110, exemplifies the tension.  Although the article is presented as a scholarly case study of the team, it also functions as a public-relations piece for its management, celebrating the efforts of top officers to alter the corporation's culture.  Trujillo, who co-authored several pieces with Pacanowsky, demonstrates the difficulty of serving two masters.  We particularly recommend this piece for those interested in athletic organizations. 

 

Organizational Stories

Rosemary A. Brander, Margo Paterson, and Yolande E. Chan, “Fostering Change in Organizational Culture Using a Critical Ethnographic Approach,” The Qualitative Report, Vol. 17, 2012, pp. 1-27.

Barbara Czarniawska, Narrating the Organization: Dramas of Institutional Identity, University of Chicago Press, 1997.

Paul Collier, “The Cultural Foundations of Economic Failure: A Conceptual Toolkit,” Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Vol. 126, 2016, pp. 5-24.

Anne-Laure Fayard and John Van Maanen, “Making Culture Visible: Reflections on Corporate Ethnography,” Journal of Organizational Ethnography, Vol. 4, 2015, pp. 4-27.

Cristian Odagiu and Marius Pi?urlea, “Organizational Change Management: A Cultural Approach,” Proceedings of the Scientific Conference AFASES, May 2012, pp. 157-163.

 

Applied contexts

Diane Gavin, “Starbucks Exceptionalism: An Institutional Ethnographic Exploration of Coffee Culture in America,” Journal of Psychological Issues In Organizational Culture, Vol. 4, 2013, pp. 44-58.

John Gribas and Cal W. Downs, “Metaphoric Manifestations of Talking ‘Team’ with Team Novices,” Communication Studies, Vol.53, 2002, pp. 112-28.

Sherwyn P. Morreale and Pamela S. Shockley-Zalabak, “Organizational Trust in Cultures with a History of Distrust: A Qualitative Study of Polish and Russian Leaders’ Perspectives and Experiences,” Journal of Intercultural Communication Research, Vol. 44, 2015, pp. 27-43.

Heather C. Trepal, Ioana Boie, and Victoria E. Kress, “A Relational Cultural Approach to Working with Clients with Eating Disorders,”Journal of Counseling & Development, Vol. 90, 2012, pp. 346-356.

 

Clifford Geertz

Check out Geertz’s autobiographical piece, which provides a summary both of his career and the field of cultural anthropology in general: Clifford Geertz, “An Inconstant Profession: The Anthropological Life in Interesting Times,” Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 31, 2002, pp. 1-19.

 

Other pieces of note:

Beth Eddy, “Learning to Understand Others: The Pragmatic Rhetoric of Ethnography and Religious Ethics in Clifford Geertz’s Works and Lives,” Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism, Vol. 22, 2014, pp. 137-157.

Clifford Geertz, “Shifting Aims, Moving Targets: On the Anthropology of Religion,” Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. 11, 2005, pp. 1-15.

Clifford Geertz, “What is a state if it is not a sovereign? Reflections on Politics in Complicated Places,” Current Anthropology, Vol. 45, 2004, pp. 577- 594.

Clifford Geertz, “Religion as a Cultural System,” in Language, Truth, and Religious Belief: Studies in Twentieth-Century Theory and Method in Religion, Nancy K. Frankenberry and Hans H. Penner (eds.), Oxford University Press, New York, 1999, pp. 176-217.

J. K. Gibson-Graham, “Rethinking the Economy with Thick Description and Weak Theory,” Current Anthropology, Vol. 55, 2014, pp. S147-S153.

Michael G. Peletz, “Transgenderism and Gender Pluralism in Southeast Asia Since Early Modern Times,” Current Anthropology, Vol. 47, 2006, pp. 309-340.

 

Ethnography

H. L. Goodall Jr., “Deep Play in a Poker Rally: A Sunday Among the Ferraristi of Long Island,” Qualitative Inquiry, Vol. 10, 2004, pp. 731- 767. 

Miriam Dempsey Page, “Clifford Geertz and Beyond: The Interpretive Interview/Essay and Reflexive Ethnography,” 1997, available online at https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED408618.pdf

Eric D. Teman and Maria K. E. Lahman, “Broom Closet or Fish Bowl? An Ethnographic Exploration of a University Queer Center and Oneself,” Qualitative Inquiry, Vol. 18, 2012, pp. 341-354.

Saskia Witteborn, Trudy Milburn, T., and Evelyn Y. Ho, “The Ethnography of Communication as Applied Methodology: Insights from Three Case Studies,” Journal of Applied Communication Research, Vol. 41, 2013, pp. 188-194.



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS


 RESOURCES



Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 19—Cultural Approach to Organizations

If you enjoy Pacanowsky’s work, we recommend “Postscript: A Small-Town Cop: Communication In, Out, and About a Crisis,” Communication and Organizations: An Interpretive Approach, ed. Linda Putnam and Michael Pacanowsky (Beverly Hills: Sage, 1983), 261-82. 

Paul Schrodt provides an empirical examination of the relationship between group and individual identity in “The Relationship Between Organizational Identification and Organizational Culture: Employee Perceptions of Culture and Identification in a Retail Sales Organization,” Communication Studies 53 (Summer 2002): 189-202.

As Linda Smircich's comments suggest, the tension between pragmatically based research and ethnography free of management constraints and agendas is a significant issue in the field of organizational communication.  Nick Trujillo's “Corporate Philosophy and Professional Baseball: (Re)defining the Texas Rangers,” Case Studies in Organizational Communication, ed. Beverly Davenport Sypher (New York: Guilford, 1990), 87-110, exemplifies the tension.  Although the article is presented as a scholarly case study of the team, it also functions as a public-relations piece for its management, celebrating the efforts of top officers to alter the corporation's culture.  Trujillo, who co-authored several pieces with Pacanowsky, demonstrates the difficulty of serving two masters.  We particularly recommend this piece for those interested in athletic organizations. 

 

Organizational Stories

Rosemary A. Brander, Margo Paterson, and Yolande E. Chan, “Fostering Change in Organizational Culture Using a Critical Ethnographic Approach,” The Qualitative Report, Vol. 17, 2012, pp. 1-27.

Barbara Czarniawska, Narrating the Organization: Dramas of Institutional Identity, University of Chicago Press, 1997.

Paul Collier, “The Cultural Foundations of Economic Failure: A Conceptual Toolkit,” Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Vol. 126, 2016, pp. 5-24.

Anne-Laure Fayard and John Van Maanen, “Making Culture Visible: Reflections on Corporate Ethnography,” Journal of Organizational Ethnography, Vol. 4, 2015, pp. 4-27.

Cristian Odagiu and Marius Pi?urlea, “Organizational Change Management: A Cultural Approach,” Proceedings of the Scientific Conference AFASES, May 2012, pp. 157-163.

 

Applied contexts

Diane Gavin, “Starbucks Exceptionalism: An Institutional Ethnographic Exploration of Coffee Culture in America,” Journal of Psychological Issues In Organizational Culture, Vol. 4, 2013, pp. 44-58.

John Gribas and Cal W. Downs, “Metaphoric Manifestations of Talking ‘Team’ with Team Novices,” Communication Studies, Vol.53, 2002, pp. 112-28.

Sherwyn P. Morreale and Pamela S. Shockley-Zalabak, “Organizational Trust in Cultures with a History of Distrust: A Qualitative Study of Polish and Russian Leaders’ Perspectives and Experiences,” Journal of Intercultural Communication Research, Vol. 44, 2015, pp. 27-43.

Heather C. Trepal, Ioana Boie, and Victoria E. Kress, “A Relational Cultural Approach to Working with Clients with Eating Disorders,”Journal of Counseling & Development, Vol. 90, 2012, pp. 346-356.

 

Clifford Geertz

Check out Geertz’s autobiographical piece, which provides a summary both of his career and the field of cultural anthropology in general: Clifford Geertz, “An Inconstant Profession: The Anthropological Life in Interesting Times,” Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 31, 2002, pp. 1-19.

 

Other pieces of note:

Beth Eddy, “Learning to Understand Others: The Pragmatic Rhetoric of Ethnography and Religious Ethics in Clifford Geertz’s Works and Lives,” Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism, Vol. 22, 2014, pp. 137-157.

Clifford Geertz, “Shifting Aims, Moving Targets: On the Anthropology of Religion,” Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. 11, 2005, pp. 1-15.

Clifford Geertz, “What is a state if it is not a sovereign? Reflections on Politics in Complicated Places,” Current Anthropology, Vol. 45, 2004, pp. 577- 594.

Clifford Geertz, “Religion as a Cultural System,” in Language, Truth, and Religious Belief: Studies in Twentieth-Century Theory and Method in Religion, Nancy K. Frankenberry and Hans H. Penner (eds.), Oxford University Press, New York, 1999, pp. 176-217.

J. K. Gibson-Graham, “Rethinking the Economy with Thick Description and Weak Theory,” Current Anthropology, Vol. 55, 2014, pp. S147-S153.

Michael G. Peletz, “Transgenderism and Gender Pluralism in Southeast Asia Since Early Modern Times,” Current Anthropology, Vol. 47, 2006, pp. 309-340.

 

Ethnography

H. L. Goodall Jr., “Deep Play in a Poker Rally: A Sunday Among the Ferraristi of Long Island,” Qualitative Inquiry, Vol. 10, 2004, pp. 731- 767. 

Miriam Dempsey Page, “Clifford Geertz and Beyond: The Interpretive Interview/Essay and Reflexive Ethnography,” 1997, available online at https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED408618.pdf

Eric D. Teman and Maria K. E. Lahman, “Broom Closet or Fish Bowl? An Ethnographic Exploration of a University Queer Center and Oneself,” Qualitative Inquiry, Vol. 18, 2012, pp. 341-354.

Saskia Witteborn, Trudy Milburn, T., and Evelyn Y. Ho, “The Ethnography of Communication as Applied Methodology: Insights from Three Case Studies,” Journal of Applied Communication Research, Vol. 41, 2013, pp. 188-194.



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
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  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
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  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
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  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

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