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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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New to Theory Resources?
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short video overview (3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
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Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


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Chapter 27—Cultural Studies

  • For a critical perspective on Hall as a theorist and as a critic of cultural, see Chris Rojek, Stuart Hall, Blackwell, Malden, MA, 2003.
  • For a hypothesized next stage of cultural studies, see Scott Lash, “Power After Hegemony: Cultural Studies in Mutation?,” Theory, Culture & Society, Vol. 24, 2007, pp. 55-78.
  • A more cautious (yet nonetheless sinister) critique of the economic realities behind the media is Ben H. Bagdikian, The New Media Monopoly, Beacon Press, Boston, MA, 2004. The book links the intellectual decline of the American newspaper industry to inevitable economic pressures.  Bagdikian does not fit neatly into Hall’s camp, but his effort to demonstrate the ways in which the business decisions of the economic elite limit the diversity of news coverage falls into the larger category of economic determinism.
  • Another relevant read is Barbara Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America, Henry Holt, New York, 2001. Ehrenreich describes the experience of living on minimum wage in America.  While not strictly out of a cultural studies perspective, it provides a fascinating account of trying to work at the bottom of the hierarchy.  Her follow-up shows the grim side of the white-collar existence: Barbara Ehrenreich, Bait and Switch: The (Futile) Pursuit of the American Dream, Metropolitan Books, New York, 2005.
Additional sources about Hall

The Media Education Foundation distributes a video production of an accessible lecture by Stuart Hall entitled Stuart Hall: Representation and the Media  You can check it out at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTzMsPqssOY

Ien Ang, “Stuart Hall and the Tension Between Academic and Intellectual Work,” International Journal of Cultural Studies, Vol. 19, 2016, pp. 29-41.

Gerard Goggin, “Media and Power After Stuart Hall,” Cultural Studies Review, 22, 2016, pp. 277-281.

Sut Jhally, “Stuart Hall: The last interview,” Cultural Studies, Vol. 30, 2016, pp. 332-345.

Sut Jhally, “Stuart Hall's Pessimism of the Intellect, Optimism of the Will: Reflections on an Intellectual Life,” Cultural Studies, Vol. 30, 2016, pp. 322-331.

Herbert Pimlott, “Stuart Hall’s Legacy: Thatcherism, Cultural Studies and ‘The Battle for Socialist Ideas’ During the 1980,” Socialist Studies, Vol. 12, 2017, pp. 117-133.

Hudson Vincent, “Space for Cultural Studies: Conversations with the Centre,” Cultural Studies, Vol. 27, 2013, pp. 666-686.

 

Cultural studies analyses

Jimmy Draper, “Theorizing Creative Agency Through ‘Discerned Savvy’: A Tool for the Critical Study of Media Industries,” Media, Culture, & Society, Vol. 36, 2014, pp. 1118-1133.

Jayson Harsin and Mark Hayward, “Stuart Hall's ‘Deconstructing the Popular’: Reconsiderations 30 Years Later,” Communication, Culture & Critique, Vol. 6, 2013, pp. 201-207.

Isabel Molina-Guzmán, “#OscarsSoWhite: How Stuart Hall Explains Why Nothing Changes in Hollywood and Everything is Changing,” Critical Studies in Media Communication, Vol. 33, 2016, pp. 438-454.

Elspeth Probyn, “A Feminist Love Letter to Stuart Hall; or What Feminist Cultural Studies Needs to Remember,” Cultural Studies Review, Vol. 22, 2016, pp. 294-301.

Nelly Richard, “Humanities and Social Sciences in Critical Dialogues with Cultural Studies,” Cultural Studies, Vol. 26, 2012, pp. 166-177.

D. Travers Scott, “Reconciling Hall with Discourse, Written in the Shadows of ‘Confederate’ and Rainbow Flags,” Critical Studies in Media Communication, Vol. 33, 2016, pp. 424-437.

Katherine Sender and Peter Decherney, “Stuart Hall Lives: Cultural Studies in an Age of Digital Media,” Critical Studies in Media Communication, Vol. 33, 2016, pp. 381-384.

Handel Kashope Wright, “Stuart Hall’s Relevance for the Study of African Blackness,” International Journal of Cultural Studies, Vol. 19, 2016, pp. 85-99.

 

Other teaching ideas

Catherine Driscoll, “Teaching Cultural Studies; Teaching Stuart Hall,” Cultural Studies Review, Vol. 22, 2016, pp. 269-276.



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS


 RESOURCES



Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 27—Cultural Studies

  • For a critical perspective on Hall as a theorist and as a critic of cultural, see Chris Rojek, Stuart Hall, Blackwell, Malden, MA, 2003.
  • For a hypothesized next stage of cultural studies, see Scott Lash, “Power After Hegemony: Cultural Studies in Mutation?,” Theory, Culture & Society, Vol. 24, 2007, pp. 55-78.
  • A more cautious (yet nonetheless sinister) critique of the economic realities behind the media is Ben H. Bagdikian, The New Media Monopoly, Beacon Press, Boston, MA, 2004. The book links the intellectual decline of the American newspaper industry to inevitable economic pressures.  Bagdikian does not fit neatly into Hall’s camp, but his effort to demonstrate the ways in which the business decisions of the economic elite limit the diversity of news coverage falls into the larger category of economic determinism.
  • Another relevant read is Barbara Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America, Henry Holt, New York, 2001. Ehrenreich describes the experience of living on minimum wage in America.  While not strictly out of a cultural studies perspective, it provides a fascinating account of trying to work at the bottom of the hierarchy.  Her follow-up shows the grim side of the white-collar existence: Barbara Ehrenreich, Bait and Switch: The (Futile) Pursuit of the American Dream, Metropolitan Books, New York, 2005.
Additional sources about Hall

The Media Education Foundation distributes a video production of an accessible lecture by Stuart Hall entitled Stuart Hall: Representation and the Media  You can check it out at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTzMsPqssOY

Ien Ang, “Stuart Hall and the Tension Between Academic and Intellectual Work,” International Journal of Cultural Studies, Vol. 19, 2016, pp. 29-41.

Gerard Goggin, “Media and Power After Stuart Hall,” Cultural Studies Review, 22, 2016, pp. 277-281.

Sut Jhally, “Stuart Hall: The last interview,” Cultural Studies, Vol. 30, 2016, pp. 332-345.

Sut Jhally, “Stuart Hall's Pessimism of the Intellect, Optimism of the Will: Reflections on an Intellectual Life,” Cultural Studies, Vol. 30, 2016, pp. 322-331.

Herbert Pimlott, “Stuart Hall’s Legacy: Thatcherism, Cultural Studies and ‘The Battle for Socialist Ideas’ During the 1980,” Socialist Studies, Vol. 12, 2017, pp. 117-133.

Hudson Vincent, “Space for Cultural Studies: Conversations with the Centre,” Cultural Studies, Vol. 27, 2013, pp. 666-686.

 

Cultural studies analyses

Jimmy Draper, “Theorizing Creative Agency Through ‘Discerned Savvy’: A Tool for the Critical Study of Media Industries,” Media, Culture, & Society, Vol. 36, 2014, pp. 1118-1133.

Jayson Harsin and Mark Hayward, “Stuart Hall's ‘Deconstructing the Popular’: Reconsiderations 30 Years Later,” Communication, Culture & Critique, Vol. 6, 2013, pp. 201-207.

Isabel Molina-Guzmán, “#OscarsSoWhite: How Stuart Hall Explains Why Nothing Changes in Hollywood and Everything is Changing,” Critical Studies in Media Communication, Vol. 33, 2016, pp. 438-454.

Elspeth Probyn, “A Feminist Love Letter to Stuart Hall; or What Feminist Cultural Studies Needs to Remember,” Cultural Studies Review, Vol. 22, 2016, pp. 294-301.

Nelly Richard, “Humanities and Social Sciences in Critical Dialogues with Cultural Studies,” Cultural Studies, Vol. 26, 2012, pp. 166-177.

D. Travers Scott, “Reconciling Hall with Discourse, Written in the Shadows of ‘Confederate’ and Rainbow Flags,” Critical Studies in Media Communication, Vol. 33, 2016, pp. 424-437.

Katherine Sender and Peter Decherney, “Stuart Hall Lives: Cultural Studies in an Age of Digital Media,” Critical Studies in Media Communication, Vol. 33, 2016, pp. 381-384.

Handel Kashope Wright, “Stuart Hall’s Relevance for the Study of African Blackness,” International Journal of Cultural Studies, Vol. 19, 2016, pp. 85-99.

 

Other teaching ideas

Catherine Driscoll, “Teaching Cultural Studies; Teaching Stuart Hall,” Cultural Studies Review, Vol. 22, 2016, pp. 269-276.



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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