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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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resources. Read more


New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
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Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


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Chapter  5—Symbolic Interactionism

  • Good general texts are Joel M. Charon, Symbolic Interactionism: An Introduction, An Interpretation, An Integration, 7th ed, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 2000; and John P. Hewitt, Self and Society: A Symbolic Interactionist Social Psychology, Boston, Allyn and Bacon, 1991. 
  • Because Mead is a root, rather than a branch, of communication theory, symbolic interactionism's influence is pervasive in our field.  Recent studies that owe a heavy intellectual debt to Mead and Blumer include:
    • Lonnie Athens, “The Belated Appearance of ‘Radical Interactionism’ on the American Sociological Stage: The Rise of G.H.Mead and Fall of Robert Park,”  American Sociologist, Vol. 48, 2017, pp. 23-47.
    • Michael J. Carter and Celene Fuller, Carter, M. (2016). “Symbols, Meaning and Action: The Past, Present, and Future of Symbolic Interactionism,” Current Sociology, Vol. 64, 2016, pp. 931-961.
 Applied Symbolic Interactionism
  • If you or your students have an interest in the dramaturgical issues raised by Goffman, we recommend recent work in performance theory.  The journal Text and Performance Quarterly is a good place to begin. 
  • Exploring the notion of the “me” when dealing with conforming to social norms
    • Paul Hughes, “Using Symbolic Interactionism Insights as an Approach to Helping the Individual with Asperger’s Syndrome Overcome Barriers to Social Inclusion,” British Journal of Special Education, Vol. 43, 2016, pp. 60-74.
  • For students interested in sports
    • Shannon M. Baird and Kerry R. McGannon, “Mean(ing) to Me: A Symbolic Interactionist Approach to Aggression in Sport Psychology,” Quest, Vol. 61, 2009, pp. 377-396.
    • Ketra L. Armstrong, “Self, Situations, and Sport Consumption: An Exploratory Study of Symbolic Interactionism,” Journal of Sport Behavior, Vol. 30, 2007, pp. 111-129.
  • Symbolic interactionism and discussions of sexuality
    • Monica A. Longmore, “Symbolic Interactionism and the Study of Sexuality,” Journal of Sex Research, Vol. 35, 1998, pp. 44-57.
    • Ken Plummer, “Queers, Bodies, and Postmodern Sexualities: A Note on Revisiting the 'Sexual' in Symbolic Interactionism,” Qualitative Sociology, Vol. 26, 2003, pp. 515-530.

The Pygmalion Effect

  • For discussion of the Pygmalion Effect and self-fulfilling prophecy, see:
    • Larry W. Howard, Thomas Li-Ping Tang, and M. Jill Austin, “Teaching Critical Thinking Skills: Ability, Motivation, Intervention, and the Pygmalion Effect,” Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 128, 2015, pp. 133-147.
    • Len Karakowsky, Nadia DeGama, and Kenneth McBey, “Deconstructing Higgins: Gender Bias in the Pygmalion Phenomenon,” Gender in Management: An International Journal, Vol. 32, 2017, pp. 2-18.
    • William P. Nye, “George Herbert Mead and the Paradox of Prediction,” Sociology of Religion, 38, 1977, pp. 91-105.
    • Rosenthal, R. & Jacobson, L.  Pygmalion in the Classroom, Holt, New York, 1968 (reprinted 1992 by Crown House Publishing, Norwalk, CT).
    • Norbert Wiley “The Self as Self-Fulfilling Prophecy,” Symbolic Interaction, Vol. 26, 2003, pp. 501-513.

 



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS


 RESOURCES



Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter  5—Symbolic Interactionism

  • Good general texts are Joel M. Charon, Symbolic Interactionism: An Introduction, An Interpretation, An Integration, 7th ed, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 2000; and John P. Hewitt, Self and Society: A Symbolic Interactionist Social Psychology, Boston, Allyn and Bacon, 1991. 
  • Because Mead is a root, rather than a branch, of communication theory, symbolic interactionism's influence is pervasive in our field.  Recent studies that owe a heavy intellectual debt to Mead and Blumer include:
    • Lonnie Athens, “The Belated Appearance of ‘Radical Interactionism’ on the American Sociological Stage: The Rise of G.H.Mead and Fall of Robert Park,”  American Sociologist, Vol. 48, 2017, pp. 23-47.
    • Michael J. Carter and Celene Fuller, Carter, M. (2016). “Symbols, Meaning and Action: The Past, Present, and Future of Symbolic Interactionism,” Current Sociology, Vol. 64, 2016, pp. 931-961.
 Applied Symbolic Interactionism
  • If you or your students have an interest in the dramaturgical issues raised by Goffman, we recommend recent work in performance theory.  The journal Text and Performance Quarterly is a good place to begin. 
  • Exploring the notion of the “me” when dealing with conforming to social norms
    • Paul Hughes, “Using Symbolic Interactionism Insights as an Approach to Helping the Individual with Asperger’s Syndrome Overcome Barriers to Social Inclusion,” British Journal of Special Education, Vol. 43, 2016, pp. 60-74.
  • For students interested in sports
    • Shannon M. Baird and Kerry R. McGannon, “Mean(ing) to Me: A Symbolic Interactionist Approach to Aggression in Sport Psychology,” Quest, Vol. 61, 2009, pp. 377-396.
    • Ketra L. Armstrong, “Self, Situations, and Sport Consumption: An Exploratory Study of Symbolic Interactionism,” Journal of Sport Behavior, Vol. 30, 2007, pp. 111-129.
  • Symbolic interactionism and discussions of sexuality
    • Monica A. Longmore, “Symbolic Interactionism and the Study of Sexuality,” Journal of Sex Research, Vol. 35, 1998, pp. 44-57.
    • Ken Plummer, “Queers, Bodies, and Postmodern Sexualities: A Note on Revisiting the 'Sexual' in Symbolic Interactionism,” Qualitative Sociology, Vol. 26, 2003, pp. 515-530.

The Pygmalion Effect

  • For discussion of the Pygmalion Effect and self-fulfilling prophecy, see:
    • Larry W. Howard, Thomas Li-Ping Tang, and M. Jill Austin, “Teaching Critical Thinking Skills: Ability, Motivation, Intervention, and the Pygmalion Effect,” Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 128, 2015, pp. 133-147.
    • Len Karakowsky, Nadia DeGama, and Kenneth McBey, “Deconstructing Higgins: Gender Bias in the Pygmalion Phenomenon,” Gender in Management: An International Journal, Vol. 32, 2017, pp. 2-18.
    • William P. Nye, “George Herbert Mead and the Paradox of Prediction,” Sociology of Religion, 38, 1977, pp. 91-105.
    • Rosenthal, R. & Jacobson, L.  Pygmalion in the Classroom, Holt, New York, 1968 (reprinted 1992 by Crown House Publishing, Norwalk, CT).
    • Norbert Wiley “The Self as Self-Fulfilling Prophecy,” Symbolic Interaction, Vol. 26, 2003, pp. 501-513.

 



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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