SELECT AN EDITION:
9th EDITION   10th EDITION

 

Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

Resources
by Type










 LINKS


 FURTHER RESOURCES



Instructors can get additional
resources. Read more


New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter  2—Talk About Theory

  • In “The Third Way: Scientific Realism and Communication Theory,” Communication Theory 9 (May 1999): 162-88, Charles Pavitt further clarifies—and complicates—the “scientific” approach to communication theory. 
  • If you’d like to read more about Em Griffin’s view of communication research, we recommend “Journal of Communication and Religion: A State-of-the-Art Review,” Journal of Communication and Religion 21 (1998): 108-40. 
  • For essays on theory and research in interpersonal communication, see Barbara Montgomery and Steve Duck, eds., Studying Interpersonal Interaction (New York: Guilford, 1991). 
  • For discussion of the ways in which science is inherently interpretive or rhetorical, see:
    • Alan Gross, Joseph Harmon, and Michael Reidy, Communicating Science: The Scientific Article from the Seventeenth Century to the Present (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002);
    • Charles Bazerman, Shaping Written Knowledge: Genre and Activity of the Experimental Article in Science (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1988);
    • Alan G. Gross, The Rhetoric of Science (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1990);

Differences between the interpretive and the objective perspectives on communication

  • For additional discussion, see Glen McClish’ article, “Humanist and Empiricist Rhetorics: Some Reflections on Rhetorical Sensitivity, Message Design Logics, and Multiple Goal Structures,” Rhetoric Society Quarterly 23 (Summer/Fall 1994): 27-45.  Because he tries to offer a way in which interpretive scholars (which he call humanists) can learn from their objective (which he call empiricist) colleagues, you may wish to revisit this article as you prepare to teach the final chapter in the book, which further explores the relationship between the two camps. 

Multiple interpretations of text

  • For further discussion, see Leah Ceccarelli, “Polysemy: Multiple Meanings in Rhetorical Criticism,” Quarterly Journal of Speech 84 (November 1998): 395-15. 

Free will and determinism

  • One of the finest discussions we know of the debate over free will and determinism is William James's “The Dilemma of Determinism,” The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy, 145-83.  James's analogy of the chess game between the novice and the expert demonstrates a kind of resolution or middle ground between the free will argument and the determinist argument (181-82).  The fact that James works religion into the discussion makes his position even more interesting. 

Science and subjectivity

  • Two intriguing discussions of science and subjectivity are James Watson's classic expose, The Double Helix (New York: NAL, 1969), and David Raup's The Nemesis Star: A Story of the Death of Dinosaurs and the Ways of Science (New York: Norton, 1986). 

Evidence

  • For discussion of the issue of what constitutes appropriate evidence in communication research, see:
    • The symposium “The Dialogue of Evidence: A Topic Revisited,” Western Journal of Communication 58 (1994): 1-71;
    • Stuart J. Sigman, “Question: Evidence of What?  Answer: Communication,” Western Journal of Communication 59 (1995): 79-84;
    • Leslie Baxter and Lee West, “On ‘Whistler's Mother’ and Discourse of the Fourth Kind,” Western Journal of Communication 60 (1996): 92-100. 


You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS


 RESOURCES



Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter  2—Talk About Theory

  • In “The Third Way: Scientific Realism and Communication Theory,” Communication Theory 9 (May 1999): 162-88, Charles Pavitt further clarifies—and complicates—the “scientific” approach to communication theory. 
  • If you’d like to read more about Em Griffin’s view of communication research, we recommend “Journal of Communication and Religion: A State-of-the-Art Review,” Journal of Communication and Religion 21 (1998): 108-40. 
  • For essays on theory and research in interpersonal communication, see Barbara Montgomery and Steve Duck, eds., Studying Interpersonal Interaction (New York: Guilford, 1991). 
  • For discussion of the ways in which science is inherently interpretive or rhetorical, see:
    • Alan Gross, Joseph Harmon, and Michael Reidy, Communicating Science: The Scientific Article from the Seventeenth Century to the Present (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002);
    • Charles Bazerman, Shaping Written Knowledge: Genre and Activity of the Experimental Article in Science (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1988);
    • Alan G. Gross, The Rhetoric of Science (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1990);

Differences between the interpretive and the objective perspectives on communication

  • For additional discussion, see Glen McClish’ article, “Humanist and Empiricist Rhetorics: Some Reflections on Rhetorical Sensitivity, Message Design Logics, and Multiple Goal Structures,” Rhetoric Society Quarterly 23 (Summer/Fall 1994): 27-45.  Because he tries to offer a way in which interpretive scholars (which he call humanists) can learn from their objective (which he call empiricist) colleagues, you may wish to revisit this article as you prepare to teach the final chapter in the book, which further explores the relationship between the two camps. 

Multiple interpretations of text

  • For further discussion, see Leah Ceccarelli, “Polysemy: Multiple Meanings in Rhetorical Criticism,” Quarterly Journal of Speech 84 (November 1998): 395-15. 

Free will and determinism

  • One of the finest discussions we know of the debate over free will and determinism is William James's “The Dilemma of Determinism,” The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy, 145-83.  James's analogy of the chess game between the novice and the expert demonstrates a kind of resolution or middle ground between the free will argument and the determinist argument (181-82).  The fact that James works religion into the discussion makes his position even more interesting. 

Science and subjectivity

  • Two intriguing discussions of science and subjectivity are James Watson's classic expose, The Double Helix (New York: NAL, 1969), and David Raup's The Nemesis Star: A Story of the Death of Dinosaurs and the Ways of Science (New York: Norton, 1986). 

Evidence

  • For discussion of the issue of what constitutes appropriate evidence in communication research, see:
    • The symposium “The Dialogue of Evidence: A Topic Revisited,” Western Journal of Communication 58 (1994): 1-71;
    • Stuart J. Sigman, “Question: Evidence of What?  Answer: Communication,” Western Journal of Communication 59 (1995): 79-84;
    • Leslie Baxter and Lee West, “On ‘Whistler's Mother’ and Discourse of the Fourth Kind,” Western Journal of Communication 60 (1996): 92-100. 


You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

Copyright © Em Griffin 2020 | Web design by Graphic Impact