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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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short video overview (3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
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Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


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Chapter 28—Uses and Gratifications

Theoretical considersations

Sarah M. Coyne, Laura M. Padilla-Walker, and Emily Howard, “Emerging in a Digital World: A Decade Review of Media Use, Effects, and Gratifications in Emerging Adulthood,” Emerging Adulthood, Vol. 1, 2013, pp. 125-137.

Hui-Fei Lin and Chi-Hua Chen, “Combining the Technology Acceptance Model and Uses and Gratifications Theory to Examine the Usage Behavior of an Augmented Reality Tour-Sharing Application,” Symmetry, Vol. 9, 2017, pp. 1-22.

Jian Raymond Rui and Michael A. Stefanone, “The Desire for Fame: An Extension of Uses and Gratifications Theory,” Communication Studies, Vol. 67, 2016, pp. 399-418.

Jiyeon So, “Uses, Gratifications, and Beyond: Toward a Model of Motivated Media Exposure and Its Effects on Risk Perception,” Communication Theory, Vol. 22, 2012, pp. 116-137.

 

Applied contexts (general)

Kristin M. Barton, “Why We Watch Them Sing and Dance: The Uses and Gratifications of Talent-Based Reality Television,” Communication Quarterly, Vol. 61, 2013, pp. 217-235.

Bela Florenthal, “Applying Uses and Gratifications Theory to Students’ LinkedIn Usage,” Young Consumers, Vol. 16, 2015, pp. 17-35.

Amanda Jo Ratcliff, Josh McCarty, and Matt Ritter, “Religion and New Media: A Uses and Gratifications Approach,” Journal of Media and Religion, Vol. 16, 2017, pp. 15-26.

 

Social media use

Amandeep Dhir, Gina M. Chen, and Sufen Chen, “Why Do We Tag Photographs on Facebook? Proposing a New Gratifications Scale,” New Media & Society, Vol. 19, 2017, pp. 502-521.

Amber L. Ferris and Erin E. Hollenbaugh, “A Uses and Gratifications Approach to Exploring Antecedents to Facebook Dependency,” Journal Of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, Vol. 62, 2018, pp. 51-70.

Rachel Grieve, “Unpacking the Characteristics of Snapchat Users: A Preliminary Investigation and an Agenda for Future Research,” Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 74, 2017, pp. 130-138.

Joe Phua, Seunga Venus Jin, and Jihoon (Jay) Kim, “Uses and Gratifications of Social Networking Sites for Bridging and Bonding Social Capital: A Comparison of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat,” Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 72, 2017, pp. 115-122.

Pavica Sheldon and Katherine Bryant, “Instagram: Motives for Its Use and Relationship to Narcissism and Contextual Age,” Computers In Human Behavior, Vol. 58, 2016, pp. 89-97.

Erin Willis and Patrick Ferrucci, “Mourning and Grief on Facebook: An Examination of Motivations for Interacting With the Deceased,” OMEGA: The Journal Of Death And Dying, Vol. 76, 2017, pp. 122-140.

 

Uses & grats in sports

Adam C. Earnheardt and Paul M. Haridakis, “Exploring Fandom and Motives for Viewing Television Sports,” in Sports Mania: Essays on Fandom and the Media in the 21st Century, Lawrence W. Hugenberg, Paul M. Haridakis, and Adam C. Earnheardt (eds.), McFarland, Jefferson, NC, 2008, pp. 158-171. 

Evan L. Frederick, Choong Hoon, Lim, Galen Clavio, and Patrick Walsh, “Why We Follow: An Examination of Parasocial Interaction and Fan Motivations for Following Athlete Archetypes on Twitter,” International Journal of Sport Communication, Vol. 5, 2012, pp. 481-502.

Seok Kang, “Mobile Communication and Pro Sports: Motivation and Fan Loyalty,” International Journal of Mobile Communications, Vol. 15, 2017, pp. 604-627.

Joon K. Kim and Kevin Hull, “How Fans are Engaging with Baseball Teams Demonstrating Multiple Objectives on Instagram,” Sport, Business And Management: An International Journal, Vol. 7, 2017, pp. 216-232.

Craig A. Morehead, Brendan O'Hallarn, and Stephen L. Shapiro, “Tell Me How You Really Feel: Analyzing Debate, Desire, and Disinhibition in Online Sports News Stories,” International Journal of Sport Communication, Vol. 9, 2016, pp. 13-35.

John S. W. Spinda, “From Good Ol' Boys to National Spectacle: Motives and Identification Among Young NASCAR Fans,” in Sports Fans, Identity, and Socialization: Exploring the Fandemonium, Adam C. Earnheardt, Paul M. Haridakis, and Barbara S. Hugenberg (eds.), Lexington Books, Lanham, MD, 2012, pp. 177-189.

 

Online gaming

Christopher J. Ferguson, Benjamin Trigani, Steven Pilato, Stephanie Miller, Kimberly Foley, and Hayley Barr, “Violent Video Games Don’t Increase Hostility in Teens, but They Do Stress Girls Out,” Psychiatric Quarterly, Vol. 87, 2016, pp. 49-56.

Taozhen Huang, Zheshi Bao, and Yan Li, “Why Do Players Purchase in Mobile Social Network Games? An Examination of Customer Engagement and of Uses and Gratifications Theory,” Program, Vol. 51, 2017, pp. 259-277.

 

Other online media

Chunmei Gan and Hongxiu Li, “Understanding the Effects of Gratifications on the Continuance Intention to Use WeChat in China: A Perspective on Uses and Gratifications,” Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 78, 2018, pp. 306-315.

Barbara K. Kaye, “Going to the Blogs: Toward the Development of a Uses and Gratifications Measurement Scale for Blogs,” Atlantic Journal of Communication, Vol. 18, 2010, pp. 194-210.

Fang-Yi Flora Wei and Y. Ken Wang, “Students’ Silent Messages: Can Teacher Verbal and Nonverbal Immediacy Moderate Student Use of Text Messaging in Class?,” Communication Education, Vol. 59, 2010, pp. 475-496.

 

Politics and civic life

Gary Hanson, Paul Michael Haridakis, Audrey Wagstaff Cunningham, Rekha Sharma, and J. D. Ponder, “The 2008 Presidential Campaign: Political Cynicism in the Age of Facebook, MySpace, and YouTube,” Mass Communication & Society, Vol. 13, 2010, pp. 584-607.

 



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS


 RESOURCES



Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 28—Uses and Gratifications

Theoretical considersations

Sarah M. Coyne, Laura M. Padilla-Walker, and Emily Howard, “Emerging in a Digital World: A Decade Review of Media Use, Effects, and Gratifications in Emerging Adulthood,” Emerging Adulthood, Vol. 1, 2013, pp. 125-137.

Hui-Fei Lin and Chi-Hua Chen, “Combining the Technology Acceptance Model and Uses and Gratifications Theory to Examine the Usage Behavior of an Augmented Reality Tour-Sharing Application,” Symmetry, Vol. 9, 2017, pp. 1-22.

Jian Raymond Rui and Michael A. Stefanone, “The Desire for Fame: An Extension of Uses and Gratifications Theory,” Communication Studies, Vol. 67, 2016, pp. 399-418.

Jiyeon So, “Uses, Gratifications, and Beyond: Toward a Model of Motivated Media Exposure and Its Effects on Risk Perception,” Communication Theory, Vol. 22, 2012, pp. 116-137.

 

Applied contexts (general)

Kristin M. Barton, “Why We Watch Them Sing and Dance: The Uses and Gratifications of Talent-Based Reality Television,” Communication Quarterly, Vol. 61, 2013, pp. 217-235.

Bela Florenthal, “Applying Uses and Gratifications Theory to Students’ LinkedIn Usage,” Young Consumers, Vol. 16, 2015, pp. 17-35.

Amanda Jo Ratcliff, Josh McCarty, and Matt Ritter, “Religion and New Media: A Uses and Gratifications Approach,” Journal of Media and Religion, Vol. 16, 2017, pp. 15-26.

 

Social media use

Amandeep Dhir, Gina M. Chen, and Sufen Chen, “Why Do We Tag Photographs on Facebook? Proposing a New Gratifications Scale,” New Media & Society, Vol. 19, 2017, pp. 502-521.

Amber L. Ferris and Erin E. Hollenbaugh, “A Uses and Gratifications Approach to Exploring Antecedents to Facebook Dependency,” Journal Of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, Vol. 62, 2018, pp. 51-70.

Rachel Grieve, “Unpacking the Characteristics of Snapchat Users: A Preliminary Investigation and an Agenda for Future Research,” Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 74, 2017, pp. 130-138.

Joe Phua, Seunga Venus Jin, and Jihoon (Jay) Kim, “Uses and Gratifications of Social Networking Sites for Bridging and Bonding Social Capital: A Comparison of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat,” Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 72, 2017, pp. 115-122.

Pavica Sheldon and Katherine Bryant, “Instagram: Motives for Its Use and Relationship to Narcissism and Contextual Age,” Computers In Human Behavior, Vol. 58, 2016, pp. 89-97.

Erin Willis and Patrick Ferrucci, “Mourning and Grief on Facebook: An Examination of Motivations for Interacting With the Deceased,” OMEGA: The Journal Of Death And Dying, Vol. 76, 2017, pp. 122-140.

 

Uses & grats in sports

Adam C. Earnheardt and Paul M. Haridakis, “Exploring Fandom and Motives for Viewing Television Sports,” in Sports Mania: Essays on Fandom and the Media in the 21st Century, Lawrence W. Hugenberg, Paul M. Haridakis, and Adam C. Earnheardt (eds.), McFarland, Jefferson, NC, 2008, pp. 158-171. 

Evan L. Frederick, Choong Hoon, Lim, Galen Clavio, and Patrick Walsh, “Why We Follow: An Examination of Parasocial Interaction and Fan Motivations for Following Athlete Archetypes on Twitter,” International Journal of Sport Communication, Vol. 5, 2012, pp. 481-502.

Seok Kang, “Mobile Communication and Pro Sports: Motivation and Fan Loyalty,” International Journal of Mobile Communications, Vol. 15, 2017, pp. 604-627.

Joon K. Kim and Kevin Hull, “How Fans are Engaging with Baseball Teams Demonstrating Multiple Objectives on Instagram,” Sport, Business And Management: An International Journal, Vol. 7, 2017, pp. 216-232.

Craig A. Morehead, Brendan O'Hallarn, and Stephen L. Shapiro, “Tell Me How You Really Feel: Analyzing Debate, Desire, and Disinhibition in Online Sports News Stories,” International Journal of Sport Communication, Vol. 9, 2016, pp. 13-35.

John S. W. Spinda, “From Good Ol' Boys to National Spectacle: Motives and Identification Among Young NASCAR Fans,” in Sports Fans, Identity, and Socialization: Exploring the Fandemonium, Adam C. Earnheardt, Paul M. Haridakis, and Barbara S. Hugenberg (eds.), Lexington Books, Lanham, MD, 2012, pp. 177-189.

 

Online gaming

Christopher J. Ferguson, Benjamin Trigani, Steven Pilato, Stephanie Miller, Kimberly Foley, and Hayley Barr, “Violent Video Games Don’t Increase Hostility in Teens, but They Do Stress Girls Out,” Psychiatric Quarterly, Vol. 87, 2016, pp. 49-56.

Taozhen Huang, Zheshi Bao, and Yan Li, “Why Do Players Purchase in Mobile Social Network Games? An Examination of Customer Engagement and of Uses and Gratifications Theory,” Program, Vol. 51, 2017, pp. 259-277.

 

Other online media

Chunmei Gan and Hongxiu Li, “Understanding the Effects of Gratifications on the Continuance Intention to Use WeChat in China: A Perspective on Uses and Gratifications,” Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 78, 2018, pp. 306-315.

Barbara K. Kaye, “Going to the Blogs: Toward the Development of a Uses and Gratifications Measurement Scale for Blogs,” Atlantic Journal of Communication, Vol. 18, 2010, pp. 194-210.

Fang-Yi Flora Wei and Y. Ken Wang, “Students’ Silent Messages: Can Teacher Verbal and Nonverbal Immediacy Moderate Student Use of Text Messaging in Class?,” Communication Education, Vol. 59, 2010, pp. 475-496.

 

Politics and civic life

Gary Hanson, Paul Michael Haridakis, Audrey Wagstaff Cunningham, Rekha Sharma, and J. D. Ponder, “The 2008 Presidential Campaign: Political Cynicism in the Age of Facebook, MySpace, and YouTube,” Mass Communication & Society, Vol. 13, 2010, pp. 584-607.

 



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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