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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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 FURTHER RESOURCES



Instructors can get additional
resources. Read more


New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter  9—Uncertainty Reduction Theory

Uncertainty reduction in close relationships
  • Kimberly J. M. Downs, “Family Commitment Role Perceptions, Social Support, and Mutual Children in Remarriage: A Test of Uncertainty Reduction Theory,” Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, Vol. 40, 2004, pp. 35-54.
  • Jennifer L. Gibbs, Nicole B. Ellison, and Chih-Hui Lai, “First Comes Love, Then Comes Google: An Investigation of Uncertainty Reduction Strategies and Self-disclosure in Online Dating,” Communication Research, Vol. 38, 2011, pp. 70-100.
  • Jennifer A. Theiss and Denise H. Solomon, “Parsing the Mechanisms That Increase Relational Intimacy: The Effects of Uncertainty Amount, Open Communication About Uncertainty, and the Reduction of Uncertainty,” Human Communication Research, Vol. 34, 2008, pp. 625-654.

Relational Turbulence Theory

As alluded to in the chapter, there is an explosion of research on relational turbulence in recent years. Just a sampling of some of those projects includes: 

  • Natalie K. Ellis and Andrew M. Ledbetter, “Why Might Distance Make the Heart Grow Fonder?: A Relational Turbulence Model Investigation of the Maintenance of Long Distance and Geographically Close Romantic Relationships,” Communication Quarterly, Vol. 63, 2015, pp. 568-585.
  • Leanne K. Knobloch, Lynne M. Knobloch-Fedders, Jeremy B. Yorgason, Aaron T. Ebata, and Patricia C. McGlaughlin, “Military Children’s Difficulty with Reintegration After Deployment: A Relational Turbulence Model Perspective,” Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 31, 2017, pp. 542-552.
  • Denise H. Solomon, Leanne K. Knobloch, Jennifer A. Theiss, and Rachel M. McLaren, “Relational Turbulence Theory: Explaining Variation in Subjective Experiences and Communication Within Romantic Relationships,” Human Communication Research, Vol. 42, 2016, pp. 507-532.

Uncertainty reduction in the digital age

  • Marjolijn L. Antheunis, Alexander P. Schouten, Patti M. Valkenburg, and Jochen Peter, “Interactive Uncertainty Reduction Strategies and Verbal Affection in Computer-mediated Communication,” Communication Research, Vol. 39, 2012, pp. 757-780.
  • Cédric Courtois, Anissa All, and Hadewijch Vanwynsberghe, “Social Network Profiles as Information Sources for Adolescents' Offline Relations,” CyberPsychology, Behavior & Social Networking, Vol. 15, 2012, pp. 290-295.
  • SeoYoung Lee and Junho Choi, “Enhancing User Experience with Conversational Agent for Movie Recommendation: Effects of Self-disclosure and Reciprocity,” International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, Vol. 103, 2017, pp. 95-105.
  • Amy May and Kelly Tenzek, “‘A Gift We are Unable to Create Ourselves’: Uncertainty Reduction in Online Classified Ads Posted by Gay Men Pursuing Surrogacy,” Journal of GLBT Family Studies, Vol. 12, pp. 430-450.
  • Amy May and Kelly E. Tenzek, “Seeking Mrs. Right: Uncertainty Reduction in Online Surrogacy Ads,” Qualitative Research Reports in Communication, Vol. 12, 2011, pp. 27-33.
  • Cynthia Palmieri, Kristen Prestano, Rosalie Gandley, Emily Overton, and Qin Zhang,”The Facebook Phenomenon: Online Self-disclosure and Uncertainty Reduction,” China Media Research, Vol. 8, 2012, pp. 108-113.

Anxiety-Uncertainty Management Theory (AUM)

  • In previous editions, Griffin covered AUM in a separate chapter. That treatment is available on the website www.afirstlook.com, under the “Theory Archive.”
  • For some other articles applying AUMT and URT, see
    • Craig R. Hullett and Kim Witte, “Predicting Intercultural Adaptation and Isolation: Using the Extended Parallel Process Model to Test Anxiety/Uncertainty Management Theory,” International Journal Of Intercultural Relations, Vol. 25, 2001, pp. 125-139.
    • Ann Neville Miller and Jennifer A. Samp, “Planning Intercultural Interaction: Extending Anxiety/Uncertainty Management Theory,” Communication Research Reports, Vol. 24, 2007, pp. 87-95.

URT in the classroom

For some other teaching ideas, see

  • Marcia Alesan Dawkins, “How it's Done: Using Hitch as a Guide to Uncertainty Reduction Theory,” Communication Teacher, Vol. 24, 2010, pp. 136-141.
  • Yifeng Hu, “Hands-on Experience with Uncertainty Reduction Theory: An Effective and Engaging Classroom Activity,” Florida Communication Journal, Vol. 43, 2015, pp. 119-123.


You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS


 RESOURCES



Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter  9—Uncertainty Reduction Theory

Uncertainty reduction in close relationships
  • Kimberly J. M. Downs, “Family Commitment Role Perceptions, Social Support, and Mutual Children in Remarriage: A Test of Uncertainty Reduction Theory,” Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, Vol. 40, 2004, pp. 35-54.
  • Jennifer L. Gibbs, Nicole B. Ellison, and Chih-Hui Lai, “First Comes Love, Then Comes Google: An Investigation of Uncertainty Reduction Strategies and Self-disclosure in Online Dating,” Communication Research, Vol. 38, 2011, pp. 70-100.
  • Jennifer A. Theiss and Denise H. Solomon, “Parsing the Mechanisms That Increase Relational Intimacy: The Effects of Uncertainty Amount, Open Communication About Uncertainty, and the Reduction of Uncertainty,” Human Communication Research, Vol. 34, 2008, pp. 625-654.

Relational Turbulence Theory

As alluded to in the chapter, there is an explosion of research on relational turbulence in recent years. Just a sampling of some of those projects includes: 

  • Natalie K. Ellis and Andrew M. Ledbetter, “Why Might Distance Make the Heart Grow Fonder?: A Relational Turbulence Model Investigation of the Maintenance of Long Distance and Geographically Close Romantic Relationships,” Communication Quarterly, Vol. 63, 2015, pp. 568-585.
  • Leanne K. Knobloch, Lynne M. Knobloch-Fedders, Jeremy B. Yorgason, Aaron T. Ebata, and Patricia C. McGlaughlin, “Military Children’s Difficulty with Reintegration After Deployment: A Relational Turbulence Model Perspective,” Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 31, 2017, pp. 542-552.
  • Denise H. Solomon, Leanne K. Knobloch, Jennifer A. Theiss, and Rachel M. McLaren, “Relational Turbulence Theory: Explaining Variation in Subjective Experiences and Communication Within Romantic Relationships,” Human Communication Research, Vol. 42, 2016, pp. 507-532.

Uncertainty reduction in the digital age

  • Marjolijn L. Antheunis, Alexander P. Schouten, Patti M. Valkenburg, and Jochen Peter, “Interactive Uncertainty Reduction Strategies and Verbal Affection in Computer-mediated Communication,” Communication Research, Vol. 39, 2012, pp. 757-780.
  • Cédric Courtois, Anissa All, and Hadewijch Vanwynsberghe, “Social Network Profiles as Information Sources for Adolescents' Offline Relations,” CyberPsychology, Behavior & Social Networking, Vol. 15, 2012, pp. 290-295.
  • SeoYoung Lee and Junho Choi, “Enhancing User Experience with Conversational Agent for Movie Recommendation: Effects of Self-disclosure and Reciprocity,” International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, Vol. 103, 2017, pp. 95-105.
  • Amy May and Kelly Tenzek, “‘A Gift We are Unable to Create Ourselves’: Uncertainty Reduction in Online Classified Ads Posted by Gay Men Pursuing Surrogacy,” Journal of GLBT Family Studies, Vol. 12, pp. 430-450.
  • Amy May and Kelly E. Tenzek, “Seeking Mrs. Right: Uncertainty Reduction in Online Surrogacy Ads,” Qualitative Research Reports in Communication, Vol. 12, 2011, pp. 27-33.
  • Cynthia Palmieri, Kristen Prestano, Rosalie Gandley, Emily Overton, and Qin Zhang,”The Facebook Phenomenon: Online Self-disclosure and Uncertainty Reduction,” China Media Research, Vol. 8, 2012, pp. 108-113.

Anxiety-Uncertainty Management Theory (AUM)

  • In previous editions, Griffin covered AUM in a separate chapter. That treatment is available on the website www.afirstlook.com, under the “Theory Archive.”
  • For some other articles applying AUMT and URT, see
    • Craig R. Hullett and Kim Witte, “Predicting Intercultural Adaptation and Isolation: Using the Extended Parallel Process Model to Test Anxiety/Uncertainty Management Theory,” International Journal Of Intercultural Relations, Vol. 25, 2001, pp. 125-139.
    • Ann Neville Miller and Jennifer A. Samp, “Planning Intercultural Interaction: Extending Anxiety/Uncertainty Management Theory,” Communication Research Reports, Vol. 24, 2007, pp. 87-95.

URT in the classroom

For some other teaching ideas, see

  • Marcia Alesan Dawkins, “How it's Done: Using Hitch as a Guide to Uncertainty Reduction Theory,” Communication Teacher, Vol. 24, 2010, pp. 136-141.
  • Yifeng Hu, “Hands-on Experience with Uncertainty Reduction Theory: An Effective and Engaging Classroom Activity,” Florida Communication Journal, Vol. 43, 2015, pp. 119-123.


You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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