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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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 LINKS


 FURTHER RESOURCES



Instructors can get additional
resources. Read more


New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 16—Cognitive Dissonance

For an intriguing application of cognitive dissonance theory to HIV/AIDS prevention, see Richard M. Perloff, Persuading People to Have Safer Sex: Applications of Social Science to the AIDS Crisis, Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ, 2001, pp. 82-83. 

 

Theoretical considerations

Amanda S. Hinojosa, William L. Gardner, H. Jack Walker, Claudia Cogliser, and Daniel Gullifor, “A Review of Cognitive Dissonance Theory in Management Research: Opportunities for Further Development,” Journal of Management, Vol. 43, 2017, pp. 170-199.

Kevin T. Mahoney, “Equity Theory at 50,” TIP: The Industrial-Organizational Psychologist, Vol. 51, 2013, pp. 158-161.

April McGrath, “Dealing with Dissonance: A Review of Cognitive Dissonance Reduction,” Social and Personality Psychology Compass, Vol. 11, 2017, published online only.

Shasha Teng, Kok Wei Khong, and Wei Wei Goh, “Persuasive Communication: A Study of Major Attitude-Behavior Theories in a Social Media Context,” Journal of Internet Commerce, 14, 2015, pp. 42-64.

 

Applied research using cognitive dissonance:

Chyng Feng Sun and Erica Scharrer, “Staying True to Disney: College Students’ Resistance to Criticism of The Little Mermaid,” Communication Review, Vol. 7, 2004, pp. 35-55.

Mary E. Kaplar and Anne K. Gordon, “The Enigma of Altruistic Lying: Perspective Differences in What Motivates and Justifies Lie Telling Within Romantic Relationships,” Personal Relationships, Vol. 11, 2004, pp. 489-507.

Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick and Simon M. Lavis, “Selecting Serious or Satirical, Supporting or Stirring News? Selective Exposure to Partisan versus Mockery News Online Videos,” Journal of Communication, Vol. 67, 2017, pp. 54-81.

David C. Matz and Wendy Wood, “Cognitive Dissonance in Groups: The Consequences of Disagreement,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 88, 2005, pp. 22-37.

Blake M. McKimmie, “CognitiveDissonancein Groups,” Social & Personality Psychology Compass, Vol. 9, 2015, pp. 202-212.

Julie A. Schumacher and Amy M. Smith Slep, “Attitudes and Dating Aggression: A Cognitive Dissonance Approach,” Prevention Science, Vol. 5, 2004, pp. 231-243.

Mark Ward Sr., “Cognition, Culture, and Charity: Sociolinguistics and 'Donor Dissonance’ in a Baptist Denomination,” Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary & Nonprofit Organizations, Vol. 26, 2015, pp. 574-603.

 

Ethical Considerations

Blake M. McKimmie, Deborah J. Terry, Michael A. Hogg, Anthony S. R. Manstead, Russell Spears, and Bertjan Doosje, “I’m a Hypocrite, but So is Everyone Else: Group Support and the Reduction of Cognitive Dissonance,” Group Dynamics, Vol. 7, 2003, pp. 214-224.

Zhi Xing Xu, Hing Keung Ma, Yue Wang, and Jian Li, “Maybe I Am Not as Moral as I Thought: Calibrating Moral Identity After Immoral Action,” Current Psychology, 2018 (published online before print).

 



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS


 RESOURCES



Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 16—Cognitive Dissonance

For an intriguing application of cognitive dissonance theory to HIV/AIDS prevention, see Richard M. Perloff, Persuading People to Have Safer Sex: Applications of Social Science to the AIDS Crisis, Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ, 2001, pp. 82-83. 

 

Theoretical considerations

Amanda S. Hinojosa, William L. Gardner, H. Jack Walker, Claudia Cogliser, and Daniel Gullifor, “A Review of Cognitive Dissonance Theory in Management Research: Opportunities for Further Development,” Journal of Management, Vol. 43, 2017, pp. 170-199.

Kevin T. Mahoney, “Equity Theory at 50,” TIP: The Industrial-Organizational Psychologist, Vol. 51, 2013, pp. 158-161.

April McGrath, “Dealing with Dissonance: A Review of Cognitive Dissonance Reduction,” Social and Personality Psychology Compass, Vol. 11, 2017, published online only.

Shasha Teng, Kok Wei Khong, and Wei Wei Goh, “Persuasive Communication: A Study of Major Attitude-Behavior Theories in a Social Media Context,” Journal of Internet Commerce, 14, 2015, pp. 42-64.

 

Applied research using cognitive dissonance:

Chyng Feng Sun and Erica Scharrer, “Staying True to Disney: College Students’ Resistance to Criticism of The Little Mermaid,” Communication Review, Vol. 7, 2004, pp. 35-55.

Mary E. Kaplar and Anne K. Gordon, “The Enigma of Altruistic Lying: Perspective Differences in What Motivates and Justifies Lie Telling Within Romantic Relationships,” Personal Relationships, Vol. 11, 2004, pp. 489-507.

Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick and Simon M. Lavis, “Selecting Serious or Satirical, Supporting or Stirring News? Selective Exposure to Partisan versus Mockery News Online Videos,” Journal of Communication, Vol. 67, 2017, pp. 54-81.

David C. Matz and Wendy Wood, “Cognitive Dissonance in Groups: The Consequences of Disagreement,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 88, 2005, pp. 22-37.

Blake M. McKimmie, “CognitiveDissonancein Groups,” Social & Personality Psychology Compass, Vol. 9, 2015, pp. 202-212.

Julie A. Schumacher and Amy M. Smith Slep, “Attitudes and Dating Aggression: A Cognitive Dissonance Approach,” Prevention Science, Vol. 5, 2004, pp. 231-243.

Mark Ward Sr., “Cognition, Culture, and Charity: Sociolinguistics and 'Donor Dissonance’ in a Baptist Denomination,” Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary & Nonprofit Organizations, Vol. 26, 2015, pp. 574-603.

 

Ethical Considerations

Blake M. McKimmie, Deborah J. Terry, Michael A. Hogg, Anthony S. R. Manstead, Russell Spears, and Bertjan Doosje, “I’m a Hypocrite, but So is Everyone Else: Group Support and the Reduction of Cognitive Dissonance,” Group Dynamics, Vol. 7, 2003, pp. 214-224.

Zhi Xing Xu, Hing Keung Ma, Yue Wang, and Jian Li, “Maybe I Am Not as Moral as I Thought: Calibrating Moral Identity After Immoral Action,” Current Psychology, 2018 (published online before print).

 



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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