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DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
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Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


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Chapter 18—Symbolic Convergence Theory

For further discussion of Bormann’s work, see Sonja K. Foss, “Fantasy-Theme Criticism,” in Rhetorical Criticism: Exploration and Practice, 5th ed, Waveland, Long Grove, IL, 2018, pp. 105-140. 

For a provocative book-length application of Bormann’s notion of symbolic convergence to the culture of a small group, see Moya Ann Ball, Vietnam-on-the-Potomac, Praeger Publishers, New York, 1992.

  • A condensed version of this study is Moya Ann Ball, “Vacillating About Vietnam: Secrecy, Duplicity, and Confusion in the Communication of President Kennedy and His Advisors,” in Group Communication in Context: Studies of Natural Groups, Lawrence R. Frey (ed.), Lawrence Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ, 1994,  pp. 181-198. 

Another excellent book-length application is Mara B. Adelman and Lawrence R. Frey, The Fragile Community: Living Together with AIDS, Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ, 1997. (This book also overlaps nicely with the bona fide group perspective presented in chapter 17 on the functional perspective).

 

Theoretical considerations

For a critique of symbolic convergence theory, see Joshua Gunn, “Refiguring Fantasy: Imagination and its Decline in U.S. Rhetorical Studies” Quarterly Journal of Speech, Vol. 89, 2003, pp. 41-60. 

  • For a response to Gunn’s article, see Ernest G. Bormann, John F. Cragan, and Donald C. Shields, “Defending Symbolic Convergence Theory from an Imaginary Gunn,” Quarterly Journal of Speech, Vol. 89, pp. 366-372.
  • Gunn then responded to their response: Joshua Gunn, “Response,” Quarterly Journal of Speech, Vol. 89, p. 373.

Alaina C. Zanin, Carrisa S. Hoelscher, and Michael W. Kramer, “Extending SymbolicConvergenceTheory: A Shared Identity Perspective of a Team’s Culture,” Small Group Research. Vol. 47, 2016, pp. 438-472.

 

Applied contexts of Bormann’s theory and fantasy theme analysis

Aubrie S. Adams, “Needs Met Through Role-Playing Games: A Fantasy Theme Analysis of Dungeons & Dragons,” Kaleidoscope: A Graduate Journal of Qualitative Communication Research, Vol. 12, 2013, pp. 69-86.

Dawn O. Braithwaite, Paul Schrodt, and Jody Koenig Kellas, “Symbolic Convergence Theory: Communication, Dramatizing Messages, and Rhetorical Visions in Families,” in Engaging Theories in Family Communication, Dawn O Braithwaite and Leslie A. Baxter (eds.), Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, 2006, pp. 146-161.

Michael E. Burns, Laura C. Farrell, Judy C. Pearson, and Derek A. Jorgenson, “Spirituality's Influence on Interpersonal Competence and Friend Group Satisfaction,” Journal of the Communication, Speech & Theatre Association of North Dakota, Vol. 29, 2016/2017, pp. 28-41.

Margaret E. Duffy and Janis Teruggi Page, “Does Political Humor Matter? You Betcha! Comedy TV's Performance of the 2008 Vice Presidential Debate,” Journal of Popular Culture, Vol. 46, 2013, pp. 545-565.

Amanda Hinnant and Elizabeth Hendrickson, “Rhetorical Visions of Health: A Fantasy-Theme Analysis of Celebrity Articles,” Celebrity Studies, Vol. 3, 2012, 197-212.

Janis Teruggi Page, Margaret Duffy, Cynthia Frisby, and Gregory Perreault, “Richard Sherman Speaks and Almost Breaks the Internet: Race, Media, and Football,” Howard Journal of Communications, Vol. 27, 2016, pp. 270-289.

Brian Simmons, “A Fantasy Theme Analysis of Ex-Christians' Online Deconversion Narratives,” Northwest Journal of Communication, Vol. 42, 2014, pp. 117-141.

Chris Underation, “Seeding the Vision: Symbolic Convergence Theory and Aimee Semple McPherson,” Atlantic Journal of Communication, Vol. 20, 2012, pp. 274-289.

Fred Vultee, “Man-Child in the White House: The Discursive Construction of Barack Obama in Reader Comments at foxnews.com,” Journalism Studies, Vol. 13, 2012, pp. 54-70.

 

Cross-cultural applications of SCT

Verónica Calvillo, “Symbolic Convergence in Bracero Corrido Narratives,” Aztlan, Vol. 42, 2017, pp. 99-126.

John L. Marambio and Chad Tew, “Clash in Paradise: A Fantasy Theme Analysis of A Day Without a Mexican,” Journal of American Culture, Vol. 29, 2006, pp. 475-492.

Elaine McKewon, “Talking Points Ammo: The Use of Neoliberal Think Tank Fantasy Themes to Delegitimise Scientific Knowledge of Climate Change in Australian Newspapers,” Journalism Studies, Vol. 13, 2012, pp. 277-297.

Mei Wu and Wen-bo Zhu, “Rise of China or Western Conspiracy? A Fantasy Theme Analysis,” China Media Research, Vol. 13, 2017, pp. 23-36.

Demi Simi and Jonathan Matusitz, “War Rape Survivors of the Second Congo War: A Perspective from Symbolic Convergence Theory,” Africa Review, Vol. 6, 2014, pp. 81-93.

Emil B. Towner, “Transcripts of Tragedy and Truths: An Analysis of Rwanda's Genocide Trial Documents,” Atlantic Journal of Communication, Vol. 23, 2015, pp. 284-297.

 



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS


 RESOURCES



Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 18—Symbolic Convergence Theory

For further discussion of Bormann’s work, see Sonja K. Foss, “Fantasy-Theme Criticism,” in Rhetorical Criticism: Exploration and Practice, 5th ed, Waveland, Long Grove, IL, 2018, pp. 105-140. 

For a provocative book-length application of Bormann’s notion of symbolic convergence to the culture of a small group, see Moya Ann Ball, Vietnam-on-the-Potomac, Praeger Publishers, New York, 1992.

  • A condensed version of this study is Moya Ann Ball, “Vacillating About Vietnam: Secrecy, Duplicity, and Confusion in the Communication of President Kennedy and His Advisors,” in Group Communication in Context: Studies of Natural Groups, Lawrence R. Frey (ed.), Lawrence Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ, 1994,  pp. 181-198. 

Another excellent book-length application is Mara B. Adelman and Lawrence R. Frey, The Fragile Community: Living Together with AIDS, Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ, 1997. (This book also overlaps nicely with the bona fide group perspective presented in chapter 17 on the functional perspective).

 

Theoretical considerations

For a critique of symbolic convergence theory, see Joshua Gunn, “Refiguring Fantasy: Imagination and its Decline in U.S. Rhetorical Studies” Quarterly Journal of Speech, Vol. 89, 2003, pp. 41-60. 

  • For a response to Gunn’s article, see Ernest G. Bormann, John F. Cragan, and Donald C. Shields, “Defending Symbolic Convergence Theory from an Imaginary Gunn,” Quarterly Journal of Speech, Vol. 89, pp. 366-372.
  • Gunn then responded to their response: Joshua Gunn, “Response,” Quarterly Journal of Speech, Vol. 89, p. 373.

Alaina C. Zanin, Carrisa S. Hoelscher, and Michael W. Kramer, “Extending SymbolicConvergenceTheory: A Shared Identity Perspective of a Team’s Culture,” Small Group Research. Vol. 47, 2016, pp. 438-472.

 

Applied contexts of Bormann’s theory and fantasy theme analysis

Aubrie S. Adams, “Needs Met Through Role-Playing Games: A Fantasy Theme Analysis of Dungeons & Dragons,” Kaleidoscope: A Graduate Journal of Qualitative Communication Research, Vol. 12, 2013, pp. 69-86.

Dawn O. Braithwaite, Paul Schrodt, and Jody Koenig Kellas, “Symbolic Convergence Theory: Communication, Dramatizing Messages, and Rhetorical Visions in Families,” in Engaging Theories in Family Communication, Dawn O Braithwaite and Leslie A. Baxter (eds.), Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, 2006, pp. 146-161.

Michael E. Burns, Laura C. Farrell, Judy C. Pearson, and Derek A. Jorgenson, “Spirituality's Influence on Interpersonal Competence and Friend Group Satisfaction,” Journal of the Communication, Speech & Theatre Association of North Dakota, Vol. 29, 2016/2017, pp. 28-41.

Margaret E. Duffy and Janis Teruggi Page, “Does Political Humor Matter? You Betcha! Comedy TV's Performance of the 2008 Vice Presidential Debate,” Journal of Popular Culture, Vol. 46, 2013, pp. 545-565.

Amanda Hinnant and Elizabeth Hendrickson, “Rhetorical Visions of Health: A Fantasy-Theme Analysis of Celebrity Articles,” Celebrity Studies, Vol. 3, 2012, 197-212.

Janis Teruggi Page, Margaret Duffy, Cynthia Frisby, and Gregory Perreault, “Richard Sherman Speaks and Almost Breaks the Internet: Race, Media, and Football,” Howard Journal of Communications, Vol. 27, 2016, pp. 270-289.

Brian Simmons, “A Fantasy Theme Analysis of Ex-Christians' Online Deconversion Narratives,” Northwest Journal of Communication, Vol. 42, 2014, pp. 117-141.

Chris Underation, “Seeding the Vision: Symbolic Convergence Theory and Aimee Semple McPherson,” Atlantic Journal of Communication, Vol. 20, 2012, pp. 274-289.

Fred Vultee, “Man-Child in the White House: The Discursive Construction of Barack Obama in Reader Comments at foxnews.com,” Journalism Studies, Vol. 13, 2012, pp. 54-70.

 

Cross-cultural applications of SCT

Verónica Calvillo, “Symbolic Convergence in Bracero Corrido Narratives,” Aztlan, Vol. 42, 2017, pp. 99-126.

John L. Marambio and Chad Tew, “Clash in Paradise: A Fantasy Theme Analysis of A Day Without a Mexican,” Journal of American Culture, Vol. 29, 2006, pp. 475-492.

Elaine McKewon, “Talking Points Ammo: The Use of Neoliberal Think Tank Fantasy Themes to Delegitimise Scientific Knowledge of Climate Change in Australian Newspapers,” Journalism Studies, Vol. 13, 2012, pp. 277-297.

Mei Wu and Wen-bo Zhu, “Rise of China or Western Conspiracy? A Fantasy Theme Analysis,” China Media Research, Vol. 13, 2017, pp. 23-36.

Demi Simi and Jonathan Matusitz, “War Rape Survivors of the Second Congo War: A Perspective from Symbolic Convergence Theory,” Africa Review, Vol. 6, 2014, pp. 81-93.

Emil B. Towner, “Transcripts of Tragedy and Truths: An Analysis of Rwanda's Genocide Trial Documents,” Atlantic Journal of Communication, Vol. 23, 2015, pp. 284-297.

 



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

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  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
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  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

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