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DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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short video overview (3:01).

Further Resources
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Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


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Chapter 11—Relational Dialectics

Other relevant essays by Baxter

Leslie A. Baxter, Elizabeth A. Suter, Lindsey J. Thomas, and Leah M. Seurer, “The Dialogic Construction of ‘Adoption’ in Online Foster Adoption Narratives,” Journal of Family Communication, Vol. 15, 2015, pp. 193-213.

Leslie A. Baxter and Dawn O. Braithwaite, “Relational Dialectics Theory, Applied,” in New Directions in Interpersonal Communication Research, Sandi W. Smith and Stephen R. Wilson (eds.), Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, 2010, pp. 48-66.

Leslie A. Baxter, Kristen M. Norwood, Bryan Asbury, and Kristina M. Scharp, “Narrating Adoption: Resisting Adoption as ‘Second Best’ in Online Stories of Domestic Adoption Told by Adoptive Parents,” Journal Of Family Communication, Vol. 14, pp. 253-269.

Dawn O. Braithwaite and Leslie A. Baxter, “‘You're my parent but you're not’: Dialectical Tensions in Stepchildren's Perceptions About Communicating with the Nonresidential Parent,” Journal Of Applied Communication Research, Vol. 34, 2006, pp. 30-48. doi:10.1080/00909880500420200

 

Applications of Relational Dialectics Theory in cross-cultural and/or marginalized communities

As mentioned earlier, you might want to explore some cross-cultural implications of the theory.  Some resources, applying RDT to other settings:

Debalina Dutta, “Cultural Barriers and Familial Resources for Negotiation of Engineering Careers Among Young Women: Relational Dialectics Theory in an Asian Perspective,” Journal of Family Communication, Vol. 17, 2017, pp. 338-355. doi:10.1080/15267431.2017.1363045

Khaled Nasser, Yasmine Dabbous, and Dima Baba, “From Strangers to Spouses: Early Relational Dialectics in Arranged Marriages Among Muslim Families in Lebanon,” Journal of Comparative Family Studies, Vol. 44, 2013, pp. 387-406.

Kristen Norwood, “Grieving Gender: Trans-identities, Transition, and Ambiguous Loss,” Communication Monographs, Vol. 80, 2013, pp. 24-45.

Carolyn M. Prentice, “The Romantic and the Practical: Using RDT 2.0 to Analyze Competing Cross-cultural Discourses,” Ohio Communication Journal, Vol. 53, 2013, pp. 44-51.

Jessica D. Ptomey, “Evidence of a Dialogical and Dialectical Protestant-Catholic Relationship in Evangelical Responses to the Selection of Pope Francis: Applying Relational Dialectics Theory to Interreligious Public Discourse and ‘Dialogue,’” Journal of Communication & Religion, Vol. 38, 2015, pp. 118-133.

Jake Simmons, Russell Lowery-Hart, Shawn T. Wahl, and M. Chad McBride, “Understanding the African-American Student Experience in Higher Education Through a Relational Dialectics Perspective,” Communication Education, Vol. 62, 2013, pp. 376-394.

 

Applied, state-of-the-art research

Rebecca Amati and Annegret F. Hannawa, “Relational Dialectics Theory: Disentangling Physician-Perceived Tensions of End-of-Life Communication,” Health Communication, Vol. 29, 2014, pp. 962-973.

Jesse Fox, Jeremy L. Osborn, and Katie M. Warber, “Relational Dialectics and Social Networking Sites: The Role of Facebook in Romantic Relationship Escalation, Maintenance, Conflict, and Dissolution,” Computers In Human Behavior, Vol. 35, 2014, pp. 527-534.

Danielle Halliwell, “Extending Relational Dialectics Theory: Exploring New Avenues of Research,” Communication Yearbook, Vol. 39, 2015, pp. 67-95.

Karyn Sporer and Paige W. Toller, “Family Identity Disrupted by Mental Illness and Violence: An Application of Relational Dialectics Theory,” Southern Communication Journal, 82, 2017, pp. 85-101.

Elizabeth A. Suter and Kristen M. Norwood, “Critical Theorizing in Family Communication Studies: (Re)reading Relational Dialectics Theory 2.0,” Communication Theory, Vol. 27, 2017, pp. 290-308.

Agnieszka Wozniak, Susan Lollis, and Sheila K. Marshall, “Competing Discourses Within Parent–Adolescent Conversations,” Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Vol. 31, 2014, pp. 847-867.

Erin (Sahlstein) Parcell, a former graduate student of Baxter now at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, has worked extensively in the area of the dialectical challenges in long-distance relationships.  Some articles of interest to review: 

Erin M. Sahlstein, “Relating at a Distance: Negotiating Being Together and Being Apart in Long-Distance Relationships,” Journal of Social & Personal Relationships, Vol. 21, 2004, pp. 689-710. 

Erin M. Sahlstein, “Making Plans: Praxis Strategies for Negotiating Uncertainty-Certainty in Long-Distance Relationships,” Western Journal of Communication, Vol. 70, 2006, pp. 147- 165.

 

Literary examples

For your male students in particular, we recommend Patrick O’Brian’s extensive series of sea novels, which features the extroverted, passionate, practical Captain Jack Aubrey and the introverted, cerebral, scientifically-minded Stephen Maturin, naval surgeon, naturalist, and secret agent.  Aubrey and Maturin’s complex, often tense, always vibrant friendship, which is developed and nurtured in vividly recorded dialogue, illustrates many dialectical elements and demonstrates that long-term close relationships embodying Baxter’s approach need not be romantic or familial.  The first novel in the series is Master and Commander, which is also the title of a 2003 film based on the series. 



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



Resources
by Type






 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS


 RESOURCES



Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Further Resources
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Scholarly and artistic references from the Instructors Manual and addition to the website


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 11—Relational Dialectics

Other relevant essays by Baxter

Leslie A. Baxter, Elizabeth A. Suter, Lindsey J. Thomas, and Leah M. Seurer, “The Dialogic Construction of ‘Adoption’ in Online Foster Adoption Narratives,” Journal of Family Communication, Vol. 15, 2015, pp. 193-213.

Leslie A. Baxter and Dawn O. Braithwaite, “Relational Dialectics Theory, Applied,” in New Directions in Interpersonal Communication Research, Sandi W. Smith and Stephen R. Wilson (eds.), Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, 2010, pp. 48-66.

Leslie A. Baxter, Kristen M. Norwood, Bryan Asbury, and Kristina M. Scharp, “Narrating Adoption: Resisting Adoption as ‘Second Best’ in Online Stories of Domestic Adoption Told by Adoptive Parents,” Journal Of Family Communication, Vol. 14, pp. 253-269.

Dawn O. Braithwaite and Leslie A. Baxter, “‘You're my parent but you're not’: Dialectical Tensions in Stepchildren's Perceptions About Communicating with the Nonresidential Parent,” Journal Of Applied Communication Research, Vol. 34, 2006, pp. 30-48. doi:10.1080/00909880500420200

 

Applications of Relational Dialectics Theory in cross-cultural and/or marginalized communities

As mentioned earlier, you might want to explore some cross-cultural implications of the theory.  Some resources, applying RDT to other settings:

Debalina Dutta, “Cultural Barriers and Familial Resources for Negotiation of Engineering Careers Among Young Women: Relational Dialectics Theory in an Asian Perspective,” Journal of Family Communication, Vol. 17, 2017, pp. 338-355. doi:10.1080/15267431.2017.1363045

Khaled Nasser, Yasmine Dabbous, and Dima Baba, “From Strangers to Spouses: Early Relational Dialectics in Arranged Marriages Among Muslim Families in Lebanon,” Journal of Comparative Family Studies, Vol. 44, 2013, pp. 387-406.

Kristen Norwood, “Grieving Gender: Trans-identities, Transition, and Ambiguous Loss,” Communication Monographs, Vol. 80, 2013, pp. 24-45.

Carolyn M. Prentice, “The Romantic and the Practical: Using RDT 2.0 to Analyze Competing Cross-cultural Discourses,” Ohio Communication Journal, Vol. 53, 2013, pp. 44-51.

Jessica D. Ptomey, “Evidence of a Dialogical and Dialectical Protestant-Catholic Relationship in Evangelical Responses to the Selection of Pope Francis: Applying Relational Dialectics Theory to Interreligious Public Discourse and ‘Dialogue,’” Journal of Communication & Religion, Vol. 38, 2015, pp. 118-133.

Jake Simmons, Russell Lowery-Hart, Shawn T. Wahl, and M. Chad McBride, “Understanding the African-American Student Experience in Higher Education Through a Relational Dialectics Perspective,” Communication Education, Vol. 62, 2013, pp. 376-394.

 

Applied, state-of-the-art research

Rebecca Amati and Annegret F. Hannawa, “Relational Dialectics Theory: Disentangling Physician-Perceived Tensions of End-of-Life Communication,” Health Communication, Vol. 29, 2014, pp. 962-973.

Jesse Fox, Jeremy L. Osborn, and Katie M. Warber, “Relational Dialectics and Social Networking Sites: The Role of Facebook in Romantic Relationship Escalation, Maintenance, Conflict, and Dissolution,” Computers In Human Behavior, Vol. 35, 2014, pp. 527-534.

Danielle Halliwell, “Extending Relational Dialectics Theory: Exploring New Avenues of Research,” Communication Yearbook, Vol. 39, 2015, pp. 67-95.

Karyn Sporer and Paige W. Toller, “Family Identity Disrupted by Mental Illness and Violence: An Application of Relational Dialectics Theory,” Southern Communication Journal, 82, 2017, pp. 85-101.

Elizabeth A. Suter and Kristen M. Norwood, “Critical Theorizing in Family Communication Studies: (Re)reading Relational Dialectics Theory 2.0,” Communication Theory, Vol. 27, 2017, pp. 290-308.

Agnieszka Wozniak, Susan Lollis, and Sheila K. Marshall, “Competing Discourses Within Parent–Adolescent Conversations,” Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Vol. 31, 2014, pp. 847-867.

Erin (Sahlstein) Parcell, a former graduate student of Baxter now at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, has worked extensively in the area of the dialectical challenges in long-distance relationships.  Some articles of interest to review: 

Erin M. Sahlstein, “Relating at a Distance: Negotiating Being Together and Being Apart in Long-Distance Relationships,” Journal of Social & Personal Relationships, Vol. 21, 2004, pp. 689-710. 

Erin M. Sahlstein, “Making Plans: Praxis Strategies for Negotiating Uncertainty-Certainty in Long-Distance Relationships,” Western Journal of Communication, Vol. 70, 2006, pp. 147- 165.

 

Literary examples

For your male students in particular, we recommend Patrick O’Brian’s extensive series of sea novels, which features the extroverted, passionate, practical Captain Jack Aubrey and the introverted, cerebral, scientifically-minded Stephen Maturin, naval surgeon, naturalist, and secret agent.  Aubrey and Maturin’s complex, often tense, always vibrant friendship, which is developed and nurtured in vividly recorded dialogue, illustrates many dialectical elements and demonstrates that long-term close relationships embodying Baxter’s approach need not be romantic or familial.  The first novel in the series is Master and Commander, which is also the title of a 2003 film based on the series. 



You can access Further Resouces for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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