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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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 KEY NAMES





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New to Theory Resources?
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Theory Key Names
10th Edition
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Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 16—Cognitive Dissonance

  • Leon Festinger
    • A former Stanford University social psychologist and creator of the theory of cognitive dissonance.
  • Cognitive dissonance
    • The distressing mental state caused by inconsistency between a person’s two beliefs or a belief and an action.
  • Selective exposure
    • The tendency people have to avoid information that would create cognitive dissonance because it’s incompatible with their current beliefs.
  • Dieter Frey
    • A German psychologist who concluded that selective exposure exists only when information is known to be a threat.
  • Postdecision Dissonance
    • Strong doubts experienced after making an important, close-call decision that is difficult to reverse.
  • Minimal justification hypothesis
    • A claim that the best way to stimulate an attitude change in others is to offer just enough incentive to elicit counterattitudinal behavior.
  • Compliance
    • Public conformity to another’s expectation without necessarily having a private conviction that matches the behavior.
  • Counterattitudinal advocacy
    • Publicly urging others to believe or do something that is opposed to what the advocate actually believes.
  • Dissonance thermometer
    • A hypothetical, reliable gauge of the dissonance a person feels as a result of inconsistency.
  • Self-perception theory
    • The claim that we determine our attitudes the same way that outside observers do—by observing our behavior; an alternative to cognitive dissonance theory.
  • Elliot Aronson
    • A University of California social psychologist who argues that cognitive dissonance is caused by psychological—rather than logical—inconsistency.
  • Joel Cooper
    • A Princeton University psychologist who argues that dissonance is caused by the knowledge that one's actions have unnecessarily hurt another person.
  • Claude Steele
    • A Stanford University psychologist who argues that high self-esteem is a resource for dissonance reduction.
  • Patricia Devine
    • A University of Wisconsin-Madison psychologist who believes that dissonance needs to be measured more accurately, particularly by a self-report measure of affect.
  • Daryl Bem
    • A Cornell University psychologist who argues that self-perception is a much simpler explanation of attitude change than is cognitive dissonance

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES

 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 16—Cognitive Dissonance

  • Leon Festinger
    • A former Stanford University social psychologist and creator of the theory of cognitive dissonance.
  • Cognitive dissonance
    • The distressing mental state caused by inconsistency between a person’s two beliefs or a belief and an action.
  • Selective exposure
    • The tendency people have to avoid information that would create cognitive dissonance because it’s incompatible with their current beliefs.
  • Dieter Frey
    • A German psychologist who concluded that selective exposure exists only when information is known to be a threat.
  • Postdecision Dissonance
    • Strong doubts experienced after making an important, close-call decision that is difficult to reverse.
  • Minimal justification hypothesis
    • A claim that the best way to stimulate an attitude change in others is to offer just enough incentive to elicit counterattitudinal behavior.
  • Compliance
    • Public conformity to another’s expectation without necessarily having a private conviction that matches the behavior.
  • Counterattitudinal advocacy
    • Publicly urging others to believe or do something that is opposed to what the advocate actually believes.
  • Dissonance thermometer
    • A hypothetical, reliable gauge of the dissonance a person feels as a result of inconsistency.
  • Self-perception theory
    • The claim that we determine our attitudes the same way that outside observers do—by observing our behavior; an alternative to cognitive dissonance theory.
  • Elliot Aronson
    • A University of California social psychologist who argues that cognitive dissonance is caused by psychological—rather than logical—inconsistency.
  • Joel Cooper
    • A Princeton University psychologist who argues that dissonance is caused by the knowledge that one's actions have unnecessarily hurt another person.
  • Claude Steele
    • A Stanford University psychologist who argues that high self-esteem is a resource for dissonance reduction.
  • Patricia Devine
    • A University of Wisconsin-Madison psychologist who believes that dissonance needs to be measured more accurately, particularly by a self-report measure of affect.
  • Daryl Bem
    • A Cornell University psychologist who argues that self-perception is a much simpler explanation of attitude change than is cognitive dissonance

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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