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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES





 LINKS





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resources. Read more


New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
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Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 21—Critical Theory of Communication in Organizations

  • Stanley Deetz
    • University of Colorado communication professor and proponent of a critical theory of organizational communication.
  • Corporate colonization
    • Encroachment of modern corporations into every area of life outside the workplace.
  • Information model
    • A view that communication is merely a conduit for the transmission of information about the real world.
  • Communication model
    • A view that language is the principal medium through which social reality is created and sustained.
  • Codetermination
    • Collaborative decision making; participatory democracy in the workplace.
  • Managerialism
    • A systematic logic, set of routine practices, and ideology that values control over all other concerns.
  • Consent
    • The process by which employees actively, though unknowingly, accomplish managerial interests in a faulty attempt to fulfill their own.
  • Systematically distorted communication
    • Operating outside of employees’ awareness, this form of discourse restricts what can be said or even considered.
  • Discursive closure
    • Suppression of conflict without employees’ realization that they are complicit in their own censorship.
  • Involvement
    • Organizational stakeholders’ free expression of ideas that may or may not affect managerial decisions. 
  • Participation
    • Stakeholder democracy; the process by which all stakeholders in an organization negotiate power and openly reach collaborative decisions.
  • PARC model
    • Politically attentive relational constructivism; a collaborative view of communication based in stakeholder conflict.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES

 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 21—Critical Theory of Communication in Organizations

  • Stanley Deetz
    • University of Colorado communication professor and proponent of a critical theory of organizational communication.
  • Corporate colonization
    • Encroachment of modern corporations into every area of life outside the workplace.
  • Information model
    • A view that communication is merely a conduit for the transmission of information about the real world.
  • Communication model
    • A view that language is the principal medium through which social reality is created and sustained.
  • Codetermination
    • Collaborative decision making; participatory democracy in the workplace.
  • Managerialism
    • A systematic logic, set of routine practices, and ideology that values control over all other concerns.
  • Consent
    • The process by which employees actively, though unknowingly, accomplish managerial interests in a faulty attempt to fulfill their own.
  • Systematically distorted communication
    • Operating outside of employees’ awareness, this form of discourse restricts what can be said or even considered.
  • Discursive closure
    • Suppression of conflict without employees’ realization that they are complicit in their own censorship.
  • Involvement
    • Organizational stakeholders’ free expression of ideas that may or may not affect managerial decisions. 
  • Participation
    • Stakeholder democracy; the process by which all stakeholders in an organization negotiate power and openly reach collaborative decisions.
  • PARC model
    • Politically attentive relational constructivism; a collaborative view of communication based in stakeholder conflict.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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