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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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 KEY NAMES





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New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
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Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 22—The Rhetoric

  • Aristotle
    • A Student of Plato, ancient Greek teacher and scholar whose Rhetoric represents the first systematic study of public speaking and audience analysis.
  • Rhetoric
    • Discovering in each case all possible means of persuasion
  • Inartistic proofs
    • External evidence that the speaker doesn’t create.
  • Artistic proofs
    • Internal proofs that contain logos, pathos, and ethos appeals.
  • Logos
    • Proofs that appeal to listeners’ rationality; lines of argument that seem reasonable; enthymemes and examples.
  • Enthymeme
    • An incomplete version of a formal deductive syllogism that is created by leaving out a premise that is already accepted by the audience or by leaving an obvious conclusion unstated; a reasonable argument.
  • Lloyd Bitzer
    • Late rhetorician from the University of Wisconsin who argued that the audience helps construct an enthymematic proof by supplying the missing premise.
  • Pathos
    • Proofs consisting of feelings and emotions elicited by the speech. 
  • Ethos
    • Perceived credibility consisting of auditors’ judgment of the speaker’s intelligence, character, and goodwill toward the audience, as these personal characteristics are revealed throughout the speech.
  • Canons of rhetoric
    • The principal divisions of the art of persuasion established by ancient rhetoricians:  invention, arrangement, style, delivery, and memory.
  • Invention
    • The speaker’s “hunt” for arguments that will be effective in a particular speech.
  • Golden mean
    • The virtue of moderation; the virtuous person develops habits that avoids extremes.  

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES

 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 22—The Rhetoric

  • Aristotle
    • A Student of Plato, ancient Greek teacher and scholar whose Rhetoric represents the first systematic study of public speaking and audience analysis.
  • Rhetoric
    • Discovering in each case all possible means of persuasion
  • Inartistic proofs
    • External evidence that the speaker doesn’t create.
  • Artistic proofs
    • Internal proofs that contain logos, pathos, and ethos appeals.
  • Logos
    • Proofs that appeal to listeners’ rationality; lines of argument that seem reasonable; enthymemes and examples.
  • Enthymeme
    • An incomplete version of a formal deductive syllogism that is created by leaving out a premise that is already accepted by the audience or by leaving an obvious conclusion unstated; a reasonable argument.
  • Lloyd Bitzer
    • Late rhetorician from the University of Wisconsin who argued that the audience helps construct an enthymematic proof by supplying the missing premise.
  • Pathos
    • Proofs consisting of feelings and emotions elicited by the speech. 
  • Ethos
    • Perceived credibility consisting of auditors’ judgment of the speaker’s intelligence, character, and goodwill toward the audience, as these personal characteristics are revealed throughout the speech.
  • Canons of rhetoric
    • The principal divisions of the art of persuasion established by ancient rhetoricians:  invention, arrangement, style, delivery, and memory.
  • Invention
    • The speaker’s “hunt” for arguments that will be effective in a particular speech.
  • Golden mean
    • The virtue of moderation; the virtuous person develops habits that avoids extremes.  

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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