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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES





 LINKS





Instructors can get additional
resources. Read more


New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
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Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 15—Elaboration Likelihood Model

  • Richard Petty and John Cacioppo
    • Psychologists from Ohio State University and the University of Chicago respectively, who created the elaboration likelihood model of persuasion.
  • Central route
    • Message elaboration; the path of cognitive processing that involves scrutiny of message content.
  • Peripheral route
    • A mental shortcut process that accepts or rejects a message based on irrelevant cues as opposed to actively thinking about the issue.
  • Robert Cialdini
    • Arizona State University researcher who has identified six peripheral cues that trigger automatic responses.
  • Message elaboration
    • The extent to which a person carefully thinks about the issue-relevant arguments contained in a persuasive communication.
  • Need for cognition
    • Desire for cognitive clarity; an enjoyment of thinking through ideas even when they aren’t personally relevant.
  • Biased elaboration
    • Top-down thinking, in which predetermined conclusions color the supporting data.
  • Objective elaboration 
    • Bottom-up thinking, in which the facts are scrutinized without bias; seeking truth wherever it might lead.
  • Strong arguments
    • Claims that generate favorable thoughts when examined.
  • Source credibility
    • Audience perception of the message source’s expertise, character, and dynamism; typically a peripheral cue.
  • Paul Mongeau and James Stiff
    • An Arizona State University researcher and a communication consultant who charge that ELM’s descriptions are imprecise and ambiguous and thus cannot be adequately tested. 
  • Louis Penner and Barbara Fritzsche
    • University of South Florida psychologists whose study of Magic Johnson’s HIV announcement suggests that the effect of even powerful peripheral cues is short-lived.
  • Thomas Nilsen
    • A professor emeritus from the University of Washington who proposes that persuasive speech is ethical to the extent that it maximizes people’s ability to exercise free choice.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES

 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 15—Elaboration Likelihood Model

  • Richard Petty and John Cacioppo
    • Psychologists from Ohio State University and the University of Chicago respectively, who created the elaboration likelihood model of persuasion.
  • Central route
    • Message elaboration; the path of cognitive processing that involves scrutiny of message content.
  • Peripheral route
    • A mental shortcut process that accepts or rejects a message based on irrelevant cues as opposed to actively thinking about the issue.
  • Robert Cialdini
    • Arizona State University researcher who has identified six peripheral cues that trigger automatic responses.
  • Message elaboration
    • The extent to which a person carefully thinks about the issue-relevant arguments contained in a persuasive communication.
  • Need for cognition
    • Desire for cognitive clarity; an enjoyment of thinking through ideas even when they aren’t personally relevant.
  • Biased elaboration
    • Top-down thinking, in which predetermined conclusions color the supporting data.
  • Objective elaboration 
    • Bottom-up thinking, in which the facts are scrutinized without bias; seeking truth wherever it might lead.
  • Strong arguments
    • Claims that generate favorable thoughts when examined.
  • Source credibility
    • Audience perception of the message source’s expertise, character, and dynamism; typically a peripheral cue.
  • Paul Mongeau and James Stiff
    • An Arizona State University researcher and a communication consultant who charge that ELM’s descriptions are imprecise and ambiguous and thus cannot be adequately tested. 
  • Louis Penner and Barbara Fritzsche
    • University of South Florida psychologists whose study of Magic Johnson’s HIV announcement suggests that the effect of even powerful peripheral cues is short-lived.
  • Thomas Nilsen
    • A professor emeritus from the University of Washington who proposes that persuasive speech is ethical to the extent that it maximizes people’s ability to exercise free choice.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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