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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES





 LINKS





Instructors can get additional
resources. Read more


New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
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Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 17—Functional Perspective on Group Decision Making

  • Randy Hirokawa and Dennis Gouran
    • Communication researchers at the University of Hawaii and Pennsylvania State University respectively, who developed the functional perspective of group decision making. 
  • Functional perspective
    • A prescriptive approach that describes and predicts task-group performance when four communication functions are fulfilled.
  • Requisite functions
    • Requirements for positive group outcome; problem analysis, goal setting, identification of alternatives, and evaluation of pluses and minuses for each.
  • Problem analysis
    • Determining the nature, extent, and cause(s) of the problem facing the group.
  • Goal setting
    • Establishing criteria by which to judge proposed solutions.
  • Identification of alternatives
    • Generation of options to sufficiently solve the problem.
  • Evaluation of positive and negative characteristics
    • Testing the relative merits of each option against the criteria selected; weighing the benefits and costs.
  • John Dewey
    • Early twentieth-century American pragmatist philosopher developed the six-step process of reflective thinking.
  • Reflective thinking
    • Thinking that favors rational consideration over intuitive hunches or pressure from those with clout.
  • Jürgen Habermas
    • A German philosopher and social theorist who suggests a rational process through which people can determine right from wrong.
  • Discourse ethics
    • Jürgen Habermas’ vision of the ideal speech situation in which diverse participants could rationally reach a consensus on universal ethical standards.
  • Ideal speech situation
    • A discourse on ethical accountability in which discussants represent all who will be affected by the decision, pursue discourse in a spirit of seeking the common good, and are committed to finding universal standards. 
  • Cynthia Stohl and Michael Holmes
    • Critiquing the functional perspective, these communication researchers, from University of California, Santa Barbara and Ball State respectively, advocate adding historical and institutional functions to the process.
  • Bona fide groups
    • Real-life groups; intact groups with stable yet permeable boundaries and interdependent within their immediate context. 

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES

 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 17—Functional Perspective on Group Decision Making

  • Randy Hirokawa and Dennis Gouran
    • Communication researchers at the University of Hawaii and Pennsylvania State University respectively, who developed the functional perspective of group decision making. 
  • Functional perspective
    • A prescriptive approach that describes and predicts task-group performance when four communication functions are fulfilled.
  • Requisite functions
    • Requirements for positive group outcome; problem analysis, goal setting, identification of alternatives, and evaluation of pluses and minuses for each.
  • Problem analysis
    • Determining the nature, extent, and cause(s) of the problem facing the group.
  • Goal setting
    • Establishing criteria by which to judge proposed solutions.
  • Identification of alternatives
    • Generation of options to sufficiently solve the problem.
  • Evaluation of positive and negative characteristics
    • Testing the relative merits of each option against the criteria selected; weighing the benefits and costs.
  • John Dewey
    • Early twentieth-century American pragmatist philosopher developed the six-step process of reflective thinking.
  • Reflective thinking
    • Thinking that favors rational consideration over intuitive hunches or pressure from those with clout.
  • Jürgen Habermas
    • A German philosopher and social theorist who suggests a rational process through which people can determine right from wrong.
  • Discourse ethics
    • Jürgen Habermas’ vision of the ideal speech situation in which diverse participants could rationally reach a consensus on universal ethical standards.
  • Ideal speech situation
    • A discourse on ethical accountability in which discussants represent all who will be affected by the decision, pursue discourse in a spirit of seeking the common good, and are committed to finding universal standards. 
  • Cynthia Stohl and Michael Holmes
    • Critiquing the functional perspective, these communication researchers, from University of California, Santa Barbara and Ball State respectively, advocate adding historical and institutional functions to the process.
  • Bona fide groups
    • Real-life groups; intact groups with stable yet permeable boundaries and interdependent within their immediate context. 

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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