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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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Theory Key Names
10th Edition
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Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter  8—Social Penetration Theory

  • Irwin Altman and Dalmas Taylor
    • Social psychologists who created social penetration theory.  Altman is a researcher at University of Utah; Taylor, now deceased, was affiliated with Lincoln University, Pennsylvania. 
  • Social Penetration
    • The process of developing deeper intimacy with another person through mutual self-disclosure and other forms of vulnerability.
  • Personality Structure
    • Onion-like layers of beliefs and feelings about self, others, and the world; deeper levels are more vulnerable, protected, and central to self-image.
  • Self-disclosure
    • The voluntary sharing of personal history, preferences, attitudes, feelings, values, secrets, etc., with another person; transparency.
  • Depth of penetration
    • The degree of disclosure in a specific area of an individual’s life.
  • Law of reciprocity
    • A paced and ordered process in which openness in one person leads to openness in the other.
  • Breadth of penetration
    • The range of areas in an individual’s life over which disclosure takes place.
  • Social exchange
    • Relationship behavior and status regulated by both parties’ evaluations of perceived rewards and costs of interaction with each other.
  • John Thibaut and Harold Kelley
    • Psychologists who developed social exchange theory or the attempt to quantify the value of different outcomes for an individual.  Thibaut, now deceased, was affiliated with the University of North Carolina; Kelley is a researcher at UCLA.
  • Outcome
    • The perceived rewards minus the costs of interpersonal interaction.
  • Minimax priniciple of human behavior
    • People seek to maximize their benefits and minimize their costs.
  • Comparison level (CL)
    • The threshold above which an interpersonal outcome seems attractive; a standard for relationship satisfaction.
  • Comparison level of alternatives (CLalt)
    • The best outcomes available in other relationships; a standard for relationship stability.
  • Ethical egoism
    • The belief that individuals should live their lives so as to maximize their own pleasure and minimize their own pain.
  • Dialectical model
    • The assumption that people want both privacy and intimacy in their social relationships; they experience a tension between disclosure and withdrawal.
  • Territoriality
    • The tendency to claim a physical location or object as our own.
  • Sandra Petronio
    • Communication theorist from the Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis who developed communication privacy management theory about the intricate ways people handle conflicting desires for privacy and openness.
  • Paul Wright
    • Professor emeritus from University of North Dakota who believes that friendships often reach a point of such closeness that self-centered concerns are no longer salient.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES

 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter  8—Social Penetration Theory

  • Irwin Altman and Dalmas Taylor
    • Social psychologists who created social penetration theory.  Altman is a researcher at University of Utah; Taylor, now deceased, was affiliated with Lincoln University, Pennsylvania. 
  • Social Penetration
    • The process of developing deeper intimacy with another person through mutual self-disclosure and other forms of vulnerability.
  • Personality Structure
    • Onion-like layers of beliefs and feelings about self, others, and the world; deeper levels are more vulnerable, protected, and central to self-image.
  • Self-disclosure
    • The voluntary sharing of personal history, preferences, attitudes, feelings, values, secrets, etc., with another person; transparency.
  • Depth of penetration
    • The degree of disclosure in a specific area of an individual’s life.
  • Law of reciprocity
    • A paced and ordered process in which openness in one person leads to openness in the other.
  • Breadth of penetration
    • The range of areas in an individual’s life over which disclosure takes place.
  • Social exchange
    • Relationship behavior and status regulated by both parties’ evaluations of perceived rewards and costs of interaction with each other.
  • John Thibaut and Harold Kelley
    • Psychologists who developed social exchange theory or the attempt to quantify the value of different outcomes for an individual.  Thibaut, now deceased, was affiliated with the University of North Carolina; Kelley is a researcher at UCLA.
  • Outcome
    • The perceived rewards minus the costs of interpersonal interaction.
  • Minimax priniciple of human behavior
    • People seek to maximize their benefits and minimize their costs.
  • Comparison level (CL)
    • The threshold above which an interpersonal outcome seems attractive; a standard for relationship satisfaction.
  • Comparison level of alternatives (CLalt)
    • The best outcomes available in other relationships; a standard for relationship stability.
  • Ethical egoism
    • The belief that individuals should live their lives so as to maximize their own pleasure and minimize their own pain.
  • Dialectical model
    • The assumption that people want both privacy and intimacy in their social relationships; they experience a tension between disclosure and withdrawal.
  • Territoriality
    • The tendency to claim a physical location or object as our own.
  • Sandra Petronio
    • Communication theorist from the Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis who developed communication privacy management theory about the intricate ways people handle conflicting desires for privacy and openness.
  • Paul Wright
    • Professor emeritus from University of North Dakota who believes that friendships often reach a point of such closeness that self-centered concerns are no longer salient.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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