SELECT AN EDITION:
9th EDITION   10th EDITION

 

Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES





 LINKS





Instructors can get additional
resources. Read more


New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 32—Standpoint Theory

  • Sandra Harding
    • A philosopher of science at the University of California, Los Angeles, who has most advanced standpoint theory among feminist scholars.
  • Julia Wood
    • Professor emeritus of communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill who has championed and applied standpoint theory within the field of communication.
  • Social location
    • Our group memberships that shape our experience of the world and our ways of understanding it.
  • Standpoint
    • A perspective achieved through critical reflection on power relations and their consequences that opposes the status quo.
  • Georg Hegel
    • German philosopher whose 1807 analysis of the master-slave relationship revealed that what people “know” depends upon which group they are in and that the powerful control received knowledge.
  • Jean-Francois Lyotard
    • Previously introduced in the Media and Culture introduction, a postmodernist who favors a stance of “incredulity toward metanarratives,” including Enlightenment rationality and Western science.
  • Local knowledge
    • Knowledge situated in time, place, experience, and relative power; as opposed to knowledge from nowhere that’s supposedly value free.
  • Strong objectivity
    • The strategy of starting research from the lives of women and other marginalized groups; thus providing a less false view of reality.
  • Patricia Hill Collins
    • African American sociologist at University of Maryland who claims the patterns of “intersecting oppressions” means that black women are in a different marginalized place in society than white women or black men.
  • Seyla Benhabib
    • Professor of political science and philosophy at Yale University who maintains that a universal ethical standard is a viable possibility.
  • Intersectionality
    • All aspects of a person’s identity are intertwined, mutually constituting each other.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES

 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 32—Standpoint Theory

  • Sandra Harding
    • A philosopher of science at the University of California, Los Angeles, who has most advanced standpoint theory among feminist scholars.
  • Julia Wood
    • Professor emeritus of communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill who has championed and applied standpoint theory within the field of communication.
  • Social location
    • Our group memberships that shape our experience of the world and our ways of understanding it.
  • Standpoint
    • A perspective achieved through critical reflection on power relations and their consequences that opposes the status quo.
  • Georg Hegel
    • German philosopher whose 1807 analysis of the master-slave relationship revealed that what people “know” depends upon which group they are in and that the powerful control received knowledge.
  • Jean-Francois Lyotard
    • Previously introduced in the Media and Culture introduction, a postmodernist who favors a stance of “incredulity toward metanarratives,” including Enlightenment rationality and Western science.
  • Local knowledge
    • Knowledge situated in time, place, experience, and relative power; as opposed to knowledge from nowhere that’s supposedly value free.
  • Strong objectivity
    • The strategy of starting research from the lives of women and other marginalized groups; thus providing a less false view of reality.
  • Patricia Hill Collins
    • African American sociologist at University of Maryland who claims the patterns of “intersecting oppressions” means that black women are in a different marginalized place in society than white women or black men.
  • Seyla Benhabib
    • Professor of political science and philosophy at Yale University who maintains that a universal ethical standard is a viable possibility.
  • Intersectionality
    • All aspects of a person’s identity are intertwined, mutually constituting each other.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

Copyright © Em Griffin 2020 | Web design by Graphic Impact