SELECT AN EDITION:
9th EDITION   10th EDITION

 

Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES





 LINKS





Instructors can get additional
resources. Read more


New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter  7—Expectancy Violations Theory

  • Judee Burgoon
    • A theorist from the University of Arizona who developed expectancy violations theory.
  • Personal Space
    • The invisible, variable volume of space surrounding an individual that defines that individual’s preferred distance from others.
  • Edward Hall
    • An anthropologist from the Illinois Institute of Technology who coined the term proxemics.
  • Proxemics
    • The study of people’s use of space as a special elaboration of culture.
  • Intimate Distance
    • The American proxemic zone of 0 to 18 inches.
  • Personal Distance
    • The American proxemic zone of 18 inches to 4 feet.
  • Social Distance
    • The American proxemic zone of 4 to 10 feet.
  • Public Distance
    • The American proxemic zone of 10 feet to infinity.
  • Threat Threshold
    • The hypothetical outer boundary of intimate space; a breach by an uninvited other occasions fight or flight.
  • Arousal, relational
    • A heightened state of awareness, orienting response, or mental alertness that stimulates review of the relationship.
  • Expectancy
    • What people predict will happen, rather than what they necessarily desire.
  • Violation Valence
    • The perceived positive or negative value assigned to a breach of expectations, regardless of who the violator is.
  • Communicator Reward Valence
    • The sum of the positive and negative attributes that the person brings to the encounter plus the potential he or she has to reward or punish in the future.
  • Paul Mongeau
    • A communication researcher from Arizona State University whose research on dating demonstrates expectancy violations theory’s increased predictive power.
  • Interactional Adaptation Theory
    • A systematic approach to how people adjust their approach when another’s behavior doesn’t mesh with what’s needed, anticipated, or preferred.
  • Interaction Position
    • A person’s initial stance towards an interaction as determined by a blend of personal requirements, expectations, and desires (RED).
  • Reciprocity
    • A strong human tendency to respond to another’s action with similar behavior.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES

 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter  7—Expectancy Violations Theory

  • Judee Burgoon
    • A theorist from the University of Arizona who developed expectancy violations theory.
  • Personal Space
    • The invisible, variable volume of space surrounding an individual that defines that individual’s preferred distance from others.
  • Edward Hall
    • An anthropologist from the Illinois Institute of Technology who coined the term proxemics.
  • Proxemics
    • The study of people’s use of space as a special elaboration of culture.
  • Intimate Distance
    • The American proxemic zone of 0 to 18 inches.
  • Personal Distance
    • The American proxemic zone of 18 inches to 4 feet.
  • Social Distance
    • The American proxemic zone of 4 to 10 feet.
  • Public Distance
    • The American proxemic zone of 10 feet to infinity.
  • Threat Threshold
    • The hypothetical outer boundary of intimate space; a breach by an uninvited other occasions fight or flight.
  • Arousal, relational
    • A heightened state of awareness, orienting response, or mental alertness that stimulates review of the relationship.
  • Expectancy
    • What people predict will happen, rather than what they necessarily desire.
  • Violation Valence
    • The perceived positive or negative value assigned to a breach of expectations, regardless of who the violator is.
  • Communicator Reward Valence
    • The sum of the positive and negative attributes that the person brings to the encounter plus the potential he or she has to reward or punish in the future.
  • Paul Mongeau
    • A communication researcher from Arizona State University whose research on dating demonstrates expectancy violations theory’s increased predictive power.
  • Interactional Adaptation Theory
    • A systematic approach to how people adjust their approach when another’s behavior doesn’t mesh with what’s needed, anticipated, or preferred.
  • Interaction Position
    • A person’s initial stance towards an interaction as determined by a blend of personal requirements, expectations, and desires (RED).
  • Reciprocity
    • A strong human tendency to respond to another’s action with similar behavior.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

Copyright © Em Griffin 2020 | Web design by Graphic Impact