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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES





 LINKS





Instructors can get additional
resources. Read more


New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
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Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter  6—Coordinated Management of Meaning

  • Barnett Pearce and Vernon Cronen
    • Communication scholars from the Fielding Institute and the University of Massachusetts, respectively, who co-created the theory of coordinated management of meaning.
  • Transmission model
    • Picturing communication as a transfer of meaning by a source sending a message through a channel to a receiver.
  • Communication perspective  
    • An ongoing focus on how communication makes our social worlds.
  • Social constructionists
    • Curious, participants in a pluralistic world who believe that persons-in-conversation co-      construct their own social realities and are simultaneously shaped by the worlds they create.
  • Bond of Union
    • A lithograph by M.C. Escher that illustrates several key concepts about persons-in-conversation, particularly their interrelatedness.
  • Logical force
    • The moral pressure or sense of obligation a person feels to respond in a given way to what someone else has just said or done—“I had no choice.”
  • Coordination
    • People collaborating in an attempt to bring into being their vision of what is necessary, noble, and good and to preclude the enactment of what they fear, hate, or despise.
  • Bifurcation point
    • A critical point in a conversation where what one says next will affect the unfolding pattern of interaction and potentially take it in a different direction.
  • Mindfulness
    • The presence or awareness of what participants are making in the midst of their own conversation.
  • Dialogic communication
    • Conversation in which parties remain in the tension between holding their own perspective while being profoundly open to the other.
  • Martin Buber
    • German Jewish philosopher who developed the concept of dialogic communication.
  • Narrow ridge
    • A metaphor of I-Thou living in the dialogic tension between ethical relativism and rigid absolutism.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES

 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter  6—Coordinated Management of Meaning

  • Barnett Pearce and Vernon Cronen
    • Communication scholars from the Fielding Institute and the University of Massachusetts, respectively, who co-created the theory of coordinated management of meaning.
  • Transmission model
    • Picturing communication as a transfer of meaning by a source sending a message through a channel to a receiver.
  • Communication perspective  
    • An ongoing focus on how communication makes our social worlds.
  • Social constructionists
    • Curious, participants in a pluralistic world who believe that persons-in-conversation co-      construct their own social realities and are simultaneously shaped by the worlds they create.
  • Bond of Union
    • A lithograph by M.C. Escher that illustrates several key concepts about persons-in-conversation, particularly their interrelatedness.
  • Logical force
    • The moral pressure or sense of obligation a person feels to respond in a given way to what someone else has just said or done—“I had no choice.”
  • Coordination
    • People collaborating in an attempt to bring into being their vision of what is necessary, noble, and good and to preclude the enactment of what they fear, hate, or despise.
  • Bifurcation point
    • A critical point in a conversation where what one says next will affect the unfolding pattern of interaction and potentially take it in a different direction.
  • Mindfulness
    • The presence or awareness of what participants are making in the midst of their own conversation.
  • Dialogic communication
    • Conversation in which parties remain in the tension between holding their own perspective while being profoundly open to the other.
  • Martin Buber
    • German Jewish philosopher who developed the concept of dialogic communication.
  • Narrow ridge
    • A metaphor of I-Thou living in the dialogic tension between ethical relativism and rigid absolutism.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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