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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES





 LINKS





Instructors can get additional
resources. Read more


New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
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Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 31—Genderlect Styles

  • Deborah Tannen
    • A linguist at Georgetown University who has pioneered research in genderlect styles.
  • Genderlect
    • A term that suggests that masculine and feminine styles of discourse are best viewed as two distinct cultural dialects and not inferior or superior ways of speaking.
  • You Just Don’t Understand
    • Tannen’s best-selling book, which presents genderlect styles to a popular audience.
  • Rapport Talk
    • The typical conversational style of women, which seeks to establish connection with others.
  • Report Talk
    • The typical monologic style of men, which seeks to command attention, convey information, and win arguments.
  • Cooperative overlap
    • A supportive interruption often meant to show agreement and solidarity with the speaker.
  • Tag question
    • A short question at the end of a declarative statement, often used by women to soften the sting of potential disagreement or invite open, friendly dialogue.
  • Speech community
    • A community of people who share understandings about goals of communication, strategies for enacting those goals, and ways of interpreting communication.
  • Louise Cherry Wilkinson and Michael Lewis
    • Professors of Education, Psychology, and Communication at Syracuse who examined the speech communities of mothers and children, concluded that parents speak differently to their children and, in doing so, socialize boys and girls differently when it comes to communication.
  • Carol Gilligan
    • New York University education professor who presented a theory of moral development claiming that women tend to think and speak in an ethical voice different from that of men.
  • Aha factor
    • A subjective standard ascribing validity to an idea when it resonates with one’s personal experience.
  • Adrianne Kunkel and Brant Burleson
    • Communication scholars from the University of Kansas and (late) Purdue University, respectively, who challenge the different cultures perspective based on results from their research on comforting.
  • Senta Troemel-Ploetz
    • A German linguist and feminist who accuses Tannen of ignoring issues of male dominance, control, power, sexism, discrimination, sexual harassment, and verbal insults.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES

 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 31—Genderlect Styles

  • Deborah Tannen
    • A linguist at Georgetown University who has pioneered research in genderlect styles.
  • Genderlect
    • A term that suggests that masculine and feminine styles of discourse are best viewed as two distinct cultural dialects and not inferior or superior ways of speaking.
  • You Just Don’t Understand
    • Tannen’s best-selling book, which presents genderlect styles to a popular audience.
  • Rapport Talk
    • The typical conversational style of women, which seeks to establish connection with others.
  • Report Talk
    • The typical monologic style of men, which seeks to command attention, convey information, and win arguments.
  • Cooperative overlap
    • A supportive interruption often meant to show agreement and solidarity with the speaker.
  • Tag question
    • A short question at the end of a declarative statement, often used by women to soften the sting of potential disagreement or invite open, friendly dialogue.
  • Speech community
    • A community of people who share understandings about goals of communication, strategies for enacting those goals, and ways of interpreting communication.
  • Louise Cherry Wilkinson and Michael Lewis
    • Professors of Education, Psychology, and Communication at Syracuse who examined the speech communities of mothers and children, concluded that parents speak differently to their children and, in doing so, socialize boys and girls differently when it comes to communication.
  • Carol Gilligan
    • New York University education professor who presented a theory of moral development claiming that women tend to think and speak in an ethical voice different from that of men.
  • Aha factor
    • A subjective standard ascribing validity to an idea when it resonates with one’s personal experience.
  • Adrianne Kunkel and Brant Burleson
    • Communication scholars from the University of Kansas and (late) Purdue University, respectively, who challenge the different cultures perspective based on results from their research on comforting.
  • Senta Troemel-Ploetz
    • A German linguist and feminist who accuses Tannen of ignoring issues of male dominance, control, power, sexism, discrimination, sexual harassment, and verbal insults.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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