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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES





 LINKS





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New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
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Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 29—Cultivation Theory

  • George Gerbner
    • Late Dean Emeritus of The Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, founder of the Cultural Environment Movement, and champion of cultivation theory.
  • Institutional process analysis
    • Scholarship that penetrates behind-the-scenes of media organizations in an effort to understand what policies or practices might be lurking there.
  • Message system analysis
    • Scholarship that involves careful, systematic study of TV content, usually employing content analysis as a research method.
  • Dramatic violence
    • The overt expression or threat of physical force as part of the plot.
  • Cultivation analysis
    • Research designed to find support for the notion that those who spend more time watching TV are more likely to see the real world through TV’s lens.
  • Accessibility principle
    • When people make judgments about the world around them, they rely on the smallest bits of information that come to mind most quickly.           
  • Mainstreaming
    • The blurring, blending, and bending process by which heavy TV viewers from disparate groups develop a common outlook through constant exposure to the same images and labels.
  • Resonance
    • The condition that exists when viewers’ real-life environment is like the world of TV; these viewers are especially susceptible to TV’s cultivating power.
  • Light viewers
    • TV viewers who report that they watch no more than two hours per day.
  • Heavy viewers
    • TV viewers who report that they watch at least four hours per day; television types.
  • Cultivation differential
    • The difference in the percentage giving the “television answer” within comparable groups of light and heavy TV viewers.
  • Meta-analysis
    • A statistical procedure that blends the results of multiple empirical and independent research studies exploring the same relationship between two variables (e.g., television viewing and fear of violence).
  • Mean world syndrome
    • The cynical mindset of general mistrust of others that’s subscribed to by heavy TV viewers.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES

 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 29—Cultivation Theory

  • George Gerbner
    • Late Dean Emeritus of The Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, founder of the Cultural Environment Movement, and champion of cultivation theory.
  • Institutional process analysis
    • Scholarship that penetrates behind-the-scenes of media organizations in an effort to understand what policies or practices might be lurking there.
  • Message system analysis
    • Scholarship that involves careful, systematic study of TV content, usually employing content analysis as a research method.
  • Dramatic violence
    • The overt expression or threat of physical force as part of the plot.
  • Cultivation analysis
    • Research designed to find support for the notion that those who spend more time watching TV are more likely to see the real world through TV’s lens.
  • Accessibility principle
    • When people make judgments about the world around them, they rely on the smallest bits of information that come to mind most quickly.           
  • Mainstreaming
    • The blurring, blending, and bending process by which heavy TV viewers from disparate groups develop a common outlook through constant exposure to the same images and labels.
  • Resonance
    • The condition that exists when viewers’ real-life environment is like the world of TV; these viewers are especially susceptible to TV’s cultivating power.
  • Light viewers
    • TV viewers who report that they watch no more than two hours per day.
  • Heavy viewers
    • TV viewers who report that they watch at least four hours per day; television types.
  • Cultivation differential
    • The difference in the percentage giving the “television answer” within comparable groups of light and heavy TV viewers.
  • Meta-analysis
    • A statistical procedure that blends the results of multiple empirical and independent research studies exploring the same relationship between two variables (e.g., television viewing and fear of violence).
  • Mean world syndrome
    • The cynical mindset of general mistrust of others that’s subscribed to by heavy TV viewers.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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