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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES





 LINKS





Instructors can get additional
resources. Read more


New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
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Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 34—Communication Accommodation Theory

  • Howard Giles
    • Welsh social psychologist, now a professor of communication at the University of California, Santa Barbara, who champions communication accommodation.
  • Accommodation
    • Adjustments to communication that decrease social distance
  • Nonaccommodation
    • Communication behavior that maintains or increases social distance.
  • Social distance
    • How similar or different we are from another person.
  • Convergence
    • A strategy through which you adapt your communication behavior is such a way as to become more similar to another person.
  • Divergence
    • A communication strategy of accentuating the difference between yourself and another person.
  • Counteraccommodation
    • Direct, intentional, and even hostile ways of maximizing social distance.
  • Self-handicapping
    • For the elderly, a face-saving strategy that invokes age as a reason for not performing well.
  • Maintenance
    • Persisting in your original communication style regardless of the communication behavior of the other; similar to divergence.
  • Overaccommodation
    • Demeaning or patronizing talk; excessive concern paid to vocal clarity or amplitude, message simplification, or repetition; similar to divergence.
  • Intergroup contact
    • When communicators are aware of group affiliations that distinguish them.
  • Social identity
    • Group memberships and social categories that we use to define who we are.
  • Initial orientation
    • Communicators’ predisposition to focus on either their individual identity or group identity during a conversation.
  • Norms
    • Expectations about behavior that members of a community feel should (or should not) occur in particular situations.
  • Attribution
    • The perceptual process by which we observe what people do and then try to figure out their intent or disposition.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES

 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 34—Communication Accommodation Theory

  • Howard Giles
    • Welsh social psychologist, now a professor of communication at the University of California, Santa Barbara, who champions communication accommodation.
  • Accommodation
    • Adjustments to communication that decrease social distance
  • Nonaccommodation
    • Communication behavior that maintains or increases social distance.
  • Social distance
    • How similar or different we are from another person.
  • Convergence
    • A strategy through which you adapt your communication behavior is such a way as to become more similar to another person.
  • Divergence
    • A communication strategy of accentuating the difference between yourself and another person.
  • Counteraccommodation
    • Direct, intentional, and even hostile ways of maximizing social distance.
  • Self-handicapping
    • For the elderly, a face-saving strategy that invokes age as a reason for not performing well.
  • Maintenance
    • Persisting in your original communication style regardless of the communication behavior of the other; similar to divergence.
  • Overaccommodation
    • Demeaning or patronizing talk; excessive concern paid to vocal clarity or amplitude, message simplification, or repetition; similar to divergence.
  • Intergroup contact
    • When communicators are aware of group affiliations that distinguish them.
  • Social identity
    • Group memberships and social categories that we use to define who we are.
  • Initial orientation
    • Communicators’ predisposition to focus on either their individual identity or group identity during a conversation.
  • Norms
    • Expectations about behavior that members of a community feel should (or should not) occur in particular situations.
  • Attribution
    • The perceptual process by which we observe what people do and then try to figure out their intent or disposition.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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