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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

Resources
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 KEY NAMES





 LINKS





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New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
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Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter  5—Symbolic Interactionism

  • George Herbert Mead
    • The University of Chicago philosophy professor whose teachings were synthesized into the theory called symbolic interactionism.
  • Symbolic Interaction
    • The ongoing use of language and gestures in anticipation of how the other will react; a conversation.
  • Minding
    • An inner dialogue used to test alternatives, rehearse action, and anticipate reactions before responding; self-talk.
  • Taking the role of the other
    • The process of mentally imagining that you are someone else who is viewing you.
  • Looking-Glass Self
    • The mental image that results from taking the role of the other; the objective self; me.
  • I
    • The spontaneous driving force that fosters all that is novel, unpredictable, and unorganized in the self.
  • Me
    • The objective self; the image of self seen when one takes the role of the other.
  • Generalized other
    • The composite mental image a person has of his or her self based on community expectations and responses.
  • Participant observation
    • A method of adopting the stance of an ignorant yet interested visitor who carefully notes what people say and do in order to discover how they interpret their world.
  • Self-fulfilling prophecy
    • The tendency for our expectations to evoke responses that confirm what we originally anticipated.
  • Herbert Blumer
    • Mead's chief disciple, this University of California, Berkeley, professor coined the term symbolic interactionism.
  • Erving Goffman
    • University of California, Berkeley, sociologist who developed the metaphor of social interaction as a dramaturgical performance.
  • Emmanuel Levinas
    • European Jewish philosopher who is developed the idea of the responsive “I” and the ethical echo.
  • Responsive “I”
    • The self created by the way we respond to others.
  • Ethical echo
    • The reminder that we are responsible to take care of each other; I am my brother’s keeper.
  • Face of the “Other”
    • A human signpost that points to our ethical obligation to care for the other before we care for self.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES

 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter  5—Symbolic Interactionism

  • George Herbert Mead
    • The University of Chicago philosophy professor whose teachings were synthesized into the theory called symbolic interactionism.
  • Symbolic Interaction
    • The ongoing use of language and gestures in anticipation of how the other will react; a conversation.
  • Minding
    • An inner dialogue used to test alternatives, rehearse action, and anticipate reactions before responding; self-talk.
  • Taking the role of the other
    • The process of mentally imagining that you are someone else who is viewing you.
  • Looking-Glass Self
    • The mental image that results from taking the role of the other; the objective self; me.
  • I
    • The spontaneous driving force that fosters all that is novel, unpredictable, and unorganized in the self.
  • Me
    • The objective self; the image of self seen when one takes the role of the other.
  • Generalized other
    • The composite mental image a person has of his or her self based on community expectations and responses.
  • Participant observation
    • A method of adopting the stance of an ignorant yet interested visitor who carefully notes what people say and do in order to discover how they interpret their world.
  • Self-fulfilling prophecy
    • The tendency for our expectations to evoke responses that confirm what we originally anticipated.
  • Herbert Blumer
    • Mead's chief disciple, this University of California, Berkeley, professor coined the term symbolic interactionism.
  • Erving Goffman
    • University of California, Berkeley, sociologist who developed the metaphor of social interaction as a dramaturgical performance.
  • Emmanuel Levinas
    • European Jewish philosopher who is developed the idea of the responsive “I” and the ethical echo.
  • Responsive “I”
    • The self created by the way we respond to others.
  • Ethical echo
    • The reminder that we are responsible to take care of each other; I am my brother’s keeper.
  • Face of the “Other”
    • A human signpost that points to our ethical obligation to care for the other before we care for self.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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