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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES





 LINKS





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New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
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Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 35—Face-Negotiation Theory

  • Stella Ting-Toomey
    • California State University, Fullerton professor who created face-negotiation theory.
  • Face
    • The projected image of one’s self in a relational situation
  • Facework
    • Specific verbal and nonverbal messages that help to maintain and restore face loss, and to uphold and honor face gain.
  • Penelope Brown and Stephen Levinson
    • Cambridge University linguists who define face as the public self-image that every member of society wants to claim for himself/herself.
  • Harry Triandis
    • University of Illinois psychologist who distinguishes between collectivism and individualism.
  • Lin Yutang
    • Taiwanese scholar who calls face a psychological image that can be granted and lost, and fought for and presented as a gift.
  • Individualistic culture
    • Wherein people look out for themselves and their immediate families; I-identity; a low-context culture.
  • Collectivistic Culture
    • Wherein people identify with a larger group that is responsible for providing care in exchange for group loyalty; we-identity; a high-context culture.
  • Face-concern
    • Regard for self-face, other face, or mutual face.
  • Face-restoration
    • The self-concerned facework strategy used to preserve autonomy and defend against loss of personal freedom.
  • Face-giving
    • The other-concerned facework strategy used to defend and support another person’s need for inclusion.
  • Avoiding
    • Responding to conflict by withdrawing from open discussion.
  • Obliging
    • Accommodating or giving into the wishes of the other in a conflict situation.
  • Compromising
    • Conflict management by negotiation or bargaining; seeking a middle way.
  • Dominating
    • Competing to win when people’s interests conflict.
  • Integrating
    • Problem solving through open discussion; collaboration; a win-win resolution of conflict.
  • Self-construal
    • Self-image; the degree to which people conceive of themselves as relatively autonomous from, or connected to, others.
  • Mindfulness
    • A recognition that things are not always what they seem, and therefore seeking multiple perspectives in conflict situations. 
  • John Oetzel
    • A researcher from the University of Waikato in New Zealand who has worked with Ting-Toomey to test, critique, and expand face-negotiation theory.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES

 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 35—Face-Negotiation Theory

  • Stella Ting-Toomey
    • California State University, Fullerton professor who created face-negotiation theory.
  • Face
    • The projected image of one’s self in a relational situation
  • Facework
    • Specific verbal and nonverbal messages that help to maintain and restore face loss, and to uphold and honor face gain.
  • Penelope Brown and Stephen Levinson
    • Cambridge University linguists who define face as the public self-image that every member of society wants to claim for himself/herself.
  • Harry Triandis
    • University of Illinois psychologist who distinguishes between collectivism and individualism.
  • Lin Yutang
    • Taiwanese scholar who calls face a psychological image that can be granted and lost, and fought for and presented as a gift.
  • Individualistic culture
    • Wherein people look out for themselves and their immediate families; I-identity; a low-context culture.
  • Collectivistic Culture
    • Wherein people identify with a larger group that is responsible for providing care in exchange for group loyalty; we-identity; a high-context culture.
  • Face-concern
    • Regard for self-face, other face, or mutual face.
  • Face-restoration
    • The self-concerned facework strategy used to preserve autonomy and defend against loss of personal freedom.
  • Face-giving
    • The other-concerned facework strategy used to defend and support another person’s need for inclusion.
  • Avoiding
    • Responding to conflict by withdrawing from open discussion.
  • Obliging
    • Accommodating or giving into the wishes of the other in a conflict situation.
  • Compromising
    • Conflict management by negotiation or bargaining; seeking a middle way.
  • Dominating
    • Competing to win when people’s interests conflict.
  • Integrating
    • Problem solving through open discussion; collaboration; a win-win resolution of conflict.
  • Self-construal
    • Self-image; the degree to which people conceive of themselves as relatively autonomous from, or connected to, others.
  • Mindfulness
    • A recognition that things are not always what they seem, and therefore seeking multiple perspectives in conflict situations. 
  • John Oetzel
    • A researcher from the University of Waikato in New Zealand who has worked with Ting-Toomey to test, critique, and expand face-negotiation theory.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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