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Theory Resources

DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE THEORIES IN THE 10TH EDITION

 

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 KEY NAMES





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New to Theory Resources?
Find out more in this
short video overview (3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
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Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 11—Relational Dialectics

  • Leslie Baxter
    • Communication professor emeritus from the University of Iowa who champions the relational dialectics approach to close relationships.
  • Mikhail Bakhtin
    • A Russian intellectual who saw dialectical tension as the deep structure of all human experience.  Baxter draws heavily on his work.
  • Relational Dialectics
    • The dynamic and unceasing struggle between discourses about interpersonal relationships.
  • Discourse
    • A set of propositions that cohere around a given object of meaning.
  • Monologue
    • Dominant talk that silences competing voices.
  • Utterance chain
    • The central building blocks of meaning-making, where utterances are linked to competing discourses near and far away, already spoken and not.
  • Superaddressee
    • An utterance’s future audience, whose moral authority is beyond question.
  • Discursive struggles
    • Two or more discourses compete for dominance over meaning.
  • Internal dialectics
    • Discursive struggles played out within a relationship.
  • External dialectics
    • Discursive struggles played out between a couple and their community.
  • Integration/separation
    • A set of discursive struggles regarding independence versus interdependence; freedom versus intimacy.
  • Stability/change
    • A set of discursive struggles regarding routine versus spontaneity; traditional versus novel.
  • Expression/nonexpression
    • A set of discursive struggles regarding transparency versus secrecy; privacy versus disclosure.
  • Dominant discourse
    • Talk that is central and prominent, with power to define meaning.
  • Marginalized discourse
    • Talk that is peripheral, lacking power to define meaning.
  • Dialectical flux
    • The unpredictable, unfinalizable, indeterminate nature of personal relationships.
  • Diachronic separation
    • Voicing different discourses at different times.
  • Synchronic interplay
    • Voicing different discourses at the same time.
  • Spiraling inversion
    • Switching back and forth between two discursive struggles, voicing one and then the other.
  • Segmentation
    • A compartmentalization tactic by which different discourses speak to different aspects of the relationship.
  • Negating
    • Mentioning a marginalized discourse in order to dismiss it as unimportant.
  • Countering
    • Replacing an expected discourse with an alternative discourse.
  • Entertaining
    • Recognizing that every discourse has alternatives.
  • Transforming
    • Combining two or more discourses, changing them into something new.
  • Aesthetic moment
    • A fleeting sense of unity through a profound respect for disparate voices in dialogue.
  • Constitutive approach
    • Social construction; the belief that communication creates, sustains, and alters relationships and the social world; social construction.
  • Dialectical flux
    • The unpredictable, unfinalizable, indeterminate nature of personal relationships.
  • Sissela Bok
    • A Swedish-born philosopher and ethicist who developed the principle of veracity.
  • Critical sensibility
    • An obligation to critique dominant voices, especially those that suppress opposing discourses; a responsibility to advocate for those who are muted.
  • Consequentialist ethics
    • Judging actions solely on the basis of their beneficial or harmful outcomes.
  • Principle of veracity
    • Truthful statements are preferable to lies in the absence of special circumstances that overcome the negative weight.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

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Resources
by Type





 KEY NAMES

 VIDEOS


 ESSAY


 LINKS





Instructors can get
additional resources.
Read more

New to Theory
Resources?

Find out more
in this short
video overview
(3:01).

Theory Key Names
10th Edition
CHANGE TO
View by Theory

Annotated list of scholars and terms, from the Instructors Manual and margin notes in the text


List mode: Normal (click on theory name to show detail) | Show All details | Clear details

Chapter 11—Relational Dialectics

  • Leslie Baxter
    • Communication professor emeritus from the University of Iowa who champions the relational dialectics approach to close relationships.
  • Mikhail Bakhtin
    • A Russian intellectual who saw dialectical tension as the deep structure of all human experience.  Baxter draws heavily on his work.
  • Relational Dialectics
    • The dynamic and unceasing struggle between discourses about interpersonal relationships.
  • Discourse
    • A set of propositions that cohere around a given object of meaning.
  • Monologue
    • Dominant talk that silences competing voices.
  • Utterance chain
    • The central building blocks of meaning-making, where utterances are linked to competing discourses near and far away, already spoken and not.
  • Superaddressee
    • An utterance’s future audience, whose moral authority is beyond question.
  • Discursive struggles
    • Two or more discourses compete for dominance over meaning.
  • Internal dialectics
    • Discursive struggles played out within a relationship.
  • External dialectics
    • Discursive struggles played out between a couple and their community.
  • Integration/separation
    • A set of discursive struggles regarding independence versus interdependence; freedom versus intimacy.
  • Stability/change
    • A set of discursive struggles regarding routine versus spontaneity; traditional versus novel.
  • Expression/nonexpression
    • A set of discursive struggles regarding transparency versus secrecy; privacy versus disclosure.
  • Dominant discourse
    • Talk that is central and prominent, with power to define meaning.
  • Marginalized discourse
    • Talk that is peripheral, lacking power to define meaning.
  • Dialectical flux
    • The unpredictable, unfinalizable, indeterminate nature of personal relationships.
  • Diachronic separation
    • Voicing different discourses at different times.
  • Synchronic interplay
    • Voicing different discourses at the same time.
  • Spiraling inversion
    • Switching back and forth between two discursive struggles, voicing one and then the other.
  • Segmentation
    • A compartmentalization tactic by which different discourses speak to different aspects of the relationship.
  • Negating
    • Mentioning a marginalized discourse in order to dismiss it as unimportant.
  • Countering
    • Replacing an expected discourse with an alternative discourse.
  • Entertaining
    • Recognizing that every discourse has alternatives.
  • Transforming
    • Combining two or more discourses, changing them into something new.
  • Aesthetic moment
    • A fleeting sense of unity through a profound respect for disparate voices in dialogue.
  • Constitutive approach
    • Social construction; the belief that communication creates, sustains, and alters relationships and the social world; social construction.
  • Dialectical flux
    • The unpredictable, unfinalizable, indeterminate nature of personal relationships.
  • Sissela Bok
    • A Swedish-born philosopher and ethicist who developed the principle of veracity.
  • Critical sensibility
    • An obligation to critique dominant voices, especially those that suppress opposing discourses; a responsibility to advocate for those who are muted.
  • Consequentialist ethics
    • Judging actions solely on the basis of their beneficial or harmful outcomes.
  • Principle of veracity
    • Truthful statements are preferable to lies in the absence of special circumstances that overcome the negative weight.

You can access the Key Names for a particular chapter in several ways:

  • Switch to View by Theory, then select the desired theory/chapter from the drop-down list at the top of the page. Look in the list of available resources.
  • To quickly find a theory by chapter number, use the Table of Contents and link from there. It will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.
  • You can also use the Theory List, which will take you directly to the theory with available options highlighted.

Back to top



The screen on this device is not wide enough to display Theory Resources. Try rotating the device to landscape orientation to see if more options become available.
Resources available to all users:

  • Theory Overview—abstract of each chapter
  • Self-Help Quizzes—for student preparation
  • Chapter Outlines
  • Key Names—important names and terms in each chapter
  • Conversation Videos—interviews with theorists
  • Application Logs—student application of theories
  • Essay Questions—for student prepatation
  • Suggested Movie Clips—tie-in movie scenese to theories
  • Links—web resources related to each chapter
  • Primary Sources—for each theory with full chapter coverage
  • Further Resources—bibliographic and other suggestions
  • Changes—for each theory, since the previous edition
  • Theory Archive—PDF copies from the last edition in which a theory appeared

Resources available only to registered instructors who are logged in:

  • Discussion Suggestions
  • Exercises & Activities
  • PowerPoint® presentations you can use
  • Short Answer Quizzes—suggested questions and answers
  • Compare Texts—comparison of theories covered in A First Look and ten other textbooks

Information for Instructors. Read more


 

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